FXYD2 and Na,K-ATPase Expression in Isolated Human Proximal Tubular Cells: Disturbed Upregulation on Renal Hypomagnesemia?

FXYD2 and Na,K-ATPase Expression in Isolated Human Proximal Tubular Cells: Disturbed Upregulation... Autosomal dominant renal hypomagnesemia (OMIM 154020), associated with hypocalciuria, has been linked to a 121G to A mutation in the FXYD2 gene. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms linking this mutation to the clinical phenotype, we studied isolated proximal tubular cells from urine of a patient and a healthy subject. Cells were immortalized and used to assess the effects of hypertonicity-induced overexpression of FXYD2 on amount, activity and apparent affinities for Na+, K+ and ATP of Na,K-ATPase. Both cell lines expressed mRNA for FXYD2a and FXYD2b, and patient cells contained both the wild-type and mutated codons. FXYD2 protein expression was lower in patient cells and could be increased in both cell lines upon culturing in hyperosmotic medium but to a lesser extent in patient cells. Similarly, hyperosmotic culturing increased Na,K-ATPase protein expression and ATP hydrolyzing activity but, again, to a lesser extent in patient cells. Apparent affinities of Na,K-ATPase for Na+, K+ and ATP did not differ between patient and control cells or after hyperosmotic induction. We conclude that human proximal tubular cells respond to a hyperosmotic challenge with an increase in FXYD2 and Na,K-ATPase protein expression, though to a smaller absolute extent in patient cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

FXYD2 and Na,K-ATPase Expression in Isolated Human Proximal Tubular Cells: Disturbed Upregulation on Renal Hypomagnesemia?

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Human Physiology ; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-009-9210-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Autosomal dominant renal hypomagnesemia (OMIM 154020), associated with hypocalciuria, has been linked to a 121G to A mutation in the FXYD2 gene. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms linking this mutation to the clinical phenotype, we studied isolated proximal tubular cells from urine of a patient and a healthy subject. Cells were immortalized and used to assess the effects of hypertonicity-induced overexpression of FXYD2 on amount, activity and apparent affinities for Na+, K+ and ATP of Na,K-ATPase. Both cell lines expressed mRNA for FXYD2a and FXYD2b, and patient cells contained both the wild-type and mutated codons. FXYD2 protein expression was lower in patient cells and could be increased in both cell lines upon culturing in hyperosmotic medium but to a lesser extent in patient cells. Similarly, hyperosmotic culturing increased Na,K-ATPase protein expression and ATP hydrolyzing activity but, again, to a lesser extent in patient cells. Apparent affinities of Na,K-ATPase for Na+, K+ and ATP did not differ between patient and control cells or after hyperosmotic induction. We conclude that human proximal tubular cells respond to a hyperosmotic challenge with an increase in FXYD2 and Na,K-ATPase protein expression, though to a smaller absolute extent in patient cells.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 29, 2009

References

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