From models to ornamentals: how is flower senescence regulated?

From models to ornamentals: how is flower senescence regulated? Floral senescence involves an ordered set of events coordinated at the plant, flower, organ and cellular level. This review assesses our current understanding of the input signals, signal transduction and cellular processes that regulate petal senescence and cell death. In many species a visible sign of petal senescence is wilting. This is accompanied by remobilization of nutrients from the flower to the developing ovary or to other parts of the plant. In other species, petals abscise while still turgid. Coordinating signals for floral senescence also vary across species. In some species ethylene acts as a central regulator, in others floral senescence is ethylene insensitive and other growth regulators are implicated. Due to the variability in this coordination and sequence of events across species, identifying suitable models to study petal senescence has been challenging, and the best candidates are reviewed. Transcriptomic studies provide an overview of the MAP kinases and transcription factors that are activated during petal senescence in several species including Arabidopsis. Our understanding of downstream regulators such as autophagy genes and proteases is also improving. This gives us insights into possible signalling cascades that regulate initiation of senescence and coordination of cell death processes. It also identifies the gaps in our knowledge such as the role of microRNAs. Finally future prospects for using all this information from model to non-model species to extend vase life in ornamental species is reviewed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

From models to ornamentals: how is flower senescence regulated?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/from-models-to-ornamentals-how-is-flower-senescence-regulated-Vk3PxI2D2l
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-012-9968-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Floral senescence involves an ordered set of events coordinated at the plant, flower, organ and cellular level. This review assesses our current understanding of the input signals, signal transduction and cellular processes that regulate petal senescence and cell death. In many species a visible sign of petal senescence is wilting. This is accompanied by remobilization of nutrients from the flower to the developing ovary or to other parts of the plant. In other species, petals abscise while still turgid. Coordinating signals for floral senescence also vary across species. In some species ethylene acts as a central regulator, in others floral senescence is ethylene insensitive and other growth regulators are implicated. Due to the variability in this coordination and sequence of events across species, identifying suitable models to study petal senescence has been challenging, and the best candidates are reviewed. Transcriptomic studies provide an overview of the MAP kinases and transcription factors that are activated during petal senescence in several species including Arabidopsis. Our understanding of downstream regulators such as autophagy genes and proteases is also improving. This gives us insights into possible signalling cascades that regulate initiation of senescence and coordination of cell death processes. It also identifies the gaps in our knowledge such as the role of microRNAs. Finally future prospects for using all this information from model to non-model species to extend vase life in ornamental species is reviewed.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 15, 2012

References

  • Sucrose accelerates flower opening and delays senescence through a hormonal effect in cut lily flowers
    Arrom, L; Munné-Bosch, S
  • Hormonal changes during flower development in floral tissues of Lilium
    Arrom, L; Munné-Bosch, S
  • Changes in ultrastructure, protease and caspase-like activities during flower senescence in Lilium longiflorum
    Battelli, R; Lombardi, L; Rogers, HJ; Picciarelli, P; Lorenzi, R; Ceccarelli, N
  • Abscisic acid content of senescing petals on cut rose flowers as affected by sucrose and water stress
    Borohov, A; Tirosh, T; Halevy, AH
  • Gene expression patterns to define stages of post-harvest senescence in Alstroemeria petals
    Breeze, E; Wagstaff, C; Harrison, E; Bramke, I; Rogers, HJ; Stead, AD; Thomas, B; Buchanan-Wollaston, V
  • High-resolution temporal profiling of transcripts during Arabidopsis leaf senescence reveals a distinct chronology of processes and regulation
    Breeze, E; Harrison, E; McHattie, S; Hughes, L; Hickman, R; Hill, C; Kiddle, S; Kim, Y; Penfold, CA; Jenkins, D; Zhang, C; Morris, K; Jenner, C; Jackson, S; Thomas, B; Tabrett, A; Legaie, R; Moore, JD; Wild, DL; Ott, S; Rand, D; Beynon, J; Denby, K; Mead, A; Buchanan-Wollaston, V
  • Increasing flower longevity in Alstroemeria
    Chanasut, U; Rogers, HJ; Leverentz, MK; Griffiths, G; Thomas, B; Wagstaff, C; Stead, AD
  • Genetic modification in floriculture
    Chandler, S; Tanaka, Y
  • Overproduction of cytokinins in petunia flowers transformed with PSAG12: IPT delays corolla senescence
    Chang, H; Jones, ML; Banowetz, GM; Clark, DG
  • Chalcone synthase as a reporter in virus-induced gene silencing studies of flower senescence
    Chen, J-C; Jiang, C-Z; Gookin, TE; Hunter, DA; Clark, DG; Reid, MS

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off