From how consumers categorize natural food to their buying methods: a comparative study between France and Israel

From how consumers categorize natural food to their buying methods: a comparative study between... Based on a qualitative investigation comparing the ways in which French and Israeli “ordinary” consumers view naturalness in food, this paper questions the choices they make in terms of food supply and their relations to the food production processes and the retail channels. The results of the study highlight that these representations, with the categorizations in which they are embodied, are strongly influenced by the context of life and the socio-cultural affiliations of these consumers. The comparison between the two countries allows to underline that the logics of categorization of the natural, and the related practices, are characterized by significant differences due to food cultures and relations of trust or mistrust regarding the food chains and industries. More broadly, the article demonstrates that investigating the conceptions that consumers have of naturalness is a relevant analyzer of their dietary decisions and their perceptions of food production and distribution systems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Studies Springer Journals

From how consumers categorize natural food to their buying methods: a comparative study between France and Israel

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by INRA and Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Economics; Agricultural Economics; Environmental Economics; Agriculture
ISSN
2425-6870
eISSN
2425-6897
D.O.I.
10.1007/s41130-017-0056-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Based on a qualitative investigation comparing the ways in which French and Israeli “ordinary” consumers view naturalness in food, this paper questions the choices they make in terms of food supply and their relations to the food production processes and the retail channels. The results of the study highlight that these representations, with the categorizations in which they are embodied, are strongly influenced by the context of life and the socio-cultural affiliations of these consumers. The comparison between the two countries allows to underline that the logics of categorization of the natural, and the related practices, are characterized by significant differences due to food cultures and relations of trust or mistrust regarding the food chains and industries. More broadly, the article demonstrates that investigating the conceptions that consumers have of naturalness is a relevant analyzer of their dietary decisions and their perceptions of food production and distribution systems.

Journal

Review of Agricultural, Food and Environmental StudiesSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 12, 2017

References

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