Friction and Tribochemical Wear Behaviors of Native Oxide Layer on Silicon at Nanoscale

Friction and Tribochemical Wear Behaviors of Native Oxide Layer on Silicon at Nanoscale The friction and tribochemical wear of native oxide (SiO x ) layers formed on a silicon surface were investigated with atomic force microscopy using a silica (SiO2) sphere tip in ambient air (50% relative humidity). The native SiO x layer thickness was determined to be ~0.8 nm with auger electron spectroscopy. The oxide-free Si/H terminated silicon surface was also studied as a reference for comparison. It was found that friction is higher on the Si/SiO x surface than the Si/H surface; but, the wear of the Si/H surface occurs much more readily than that of the Si/SiO x surface when wear depth is less than the thickness of native oxide layer on Si/SiO x surface (~0.8 nm). Based on attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy analysis, the friction appears to be governed by the thickness and structure of the adsorbed water layer. Although the wear process in humid conditions is through tribochemical reactions involving the adsorbed water, the removal rate of the substrate layer varies depending on the effective activation energy. These findings are important for the tribological design of silicon-based micro/nanodevices working in humid ambience. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tribology Letters Springer Journals

Friction and Tribochemical Wear Behaviors of Native Oxide Layer on Silicon at Nanoscale

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Materials Science; Tribology, Corrosion and Coatings; Surfaces and Interfaces, Thin Films; Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; Physical Chemistry; Nanotechnology
ISSN
1023-8883
eISSN
1573-2711
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11249-017-0922-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The friction and tribochemical wear of native oxide (SiO x ) layers formed on a silicon surface were investigated with atomic force microscopy using a silica (SiO2) sphere tip in ambient air (50% relative humidity). The native SiO x layer thickness was determined to be ~0.8 nm with auger electron spectroscopy. The oxide-free Si/H terminated silicon surface was also studied as a reference for comparison. It was found that friction is higher on the Si/SiO x surface than the Si/H surface; but, the wear of the Si/H surface occurs much more readily than that of the Si/SiO x surface when wear depth is less than the thickness of native oxide layer on Si/SiO x surface (~0.8 nm). Based on attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy analysis, the friction appears to be governed by the thickness and structure of the adsorbed water layer. Although the wear process in humid conditions is through tribochemical reactions involving the adsorbed water, the removal rate of the substrate layer varies depending on the effective activation energy. These findings are important for the tribological design of silicon-based micro/nanodevices working in humid ambience.

Journal

Tribology LettersSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 15, 2017

References

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