Four Myxobolus spp. (Myxosporea: Bivalvulida) from the gill lamellae of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and Japanese silver crucian carp (Carassius langsdorfii) in the western part of Japan, with the description of three new species (M. tanakai n. sp., M. paratoyamai n. sp., and M. ginbuna n. sp.)

Four Myxobolus spp. (Myxosporea: Bivalvulida) from the gill lamellae of common carp (Cyprinus... Approximately three dozen Myxobolus spp. (Myxozoa: Myxosporea: Bivalvulida) have been described to parasitize the gills of carp of the genera Cyprinus and Carassius. Hitherto, these fish were often introduced to temperate waters worldwide as food and ornamental fish from Asia, their place of origin. The present study examined the myxosporean infection of seven common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and seven Japanese silver crucian carp (Carassius langsdorfii) collected from the Fushinogawa River around the university in Yamaguchi City, Japan, during the period April 2015 to October 2016. In total, four Myxobolus spp. were detected in the gill lamellae of Cy. carpio and Ca. langsdorfii, i.e., two species in each species of fish. The four species were characterized morphologically and genetically based on the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA). A new species, Myxobolus tanakai n. sp., from four individuals of Cy. carpio had an elongated pyriform spore (15.4–18.6 μm by 6.3–8.4 μm), resembling the spore shape of Myxobolus koi from Cy. carpio or Carassius auratus in Japan, China, and the USA, but bigger than it (13.2–15.6 μm by 6.6–7.8 μm). The new species formed a clade with M. koi but was distinct from any of the isolates of this species (nucleotide identities less than 98.6%). The second new species, Myxobolus paratoyamai n. sp., from a single Cy. carpio with its one prominent and one rudimentary polar capsule closely resembled the spore morphology of Myxobolus toyamai from Cy. carpio or Carassius gibelio in Japan, China, and the USA. However, the isolate formed a clade with Myxobolus longisporus from Cy. rubrofuscus in China rather than with M. toyamai isolates (nucleotide identities less than 97.9% with known species). Another new species, Myxobolus ginbuna n. sp., from two individuals of Ca. langsdorfii had similar-shaped spores to Myxobolus wulii, but the dimensions were smaller (11.7–13.9 μm by 8.5–9.8 μm vs. 17.6–18.5 μm by 8.9–10.0 μm). This new species formed a clade with M. wulii but was distinct from any of the M. wulii isolates from Ca. gibelio in China (nucleotide identities less than 99.1%). An additional species, Myxobolus pyramidis, from six individuals of Ca. langsdorfii was morphologically and genetically similar to the previous record from Ca. gibelio in China (99.6% nucleotide identity of the 18S rDNA). Two of these six individuals were mix-infected with M. ginbuna n. sp. This is a new host and geographical distribution record for M. pyramidis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Parasitology Research Springer Journals

Four Myxobolus spp. (Myxosporea: Bivalvulida) from the gill lamellae of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and Japanese silver crucian carp (Carassius langsdorfii) in the western part of Japan, with the description of three new species (M. tanakai n. sp., M. paratoyamai n. sp., and M. ginbuna n. sp.)

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Biomedicine; Medical Microbiology; Microbiology; Immunology
ISSN
0932-0113
eISSN
1432-1955
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00436-017-5545-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Approximately three dozen Myxobolus spp. (Myxozoa: Myxosporea: Bivalvulida) have been described to parasitize the gills of carp of the genera Cyprinus and Carassius. Hitherto, these fish were often introduced to temperate waters worldwide as food and ornamental fish from Asia, their place of origin. The present study examined the myxosporean infection of seven common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and seven Japanese silver crucian carp (Carassius langsdorfii) collected from the Fushinogawa River around the university in Yamaguchi City, Japan, during the period April 2015 to October 2016. In total, four Myxobolus spp. were detected in the gill lamellae of Cy. carpio and Ca. langsdorfii, i.e., two species in each species of fish. The four species were characterized morphologically and genetically based on the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA). A new species, Myxobolus tanakai n. sp., from four individuals of Cy. carpio had an elongated pyriform spore (15.4–18.6 μm by 6.3–8.4 μm), resembling the spore shape of Myxobolus koi from Cy. carpio or Carassius auratus in Japan, China, and the USA, but bigger than it (13.2–15.6 μm by 6.6–7.8 μm). The new species formed a clade with M. koi but was distinct from any of the isolates of this species (nucleotide identities less than 98.6%). The second new species, Myxobolus paratoyamai n. sp., from a single Cy. carpio with its one prominent and one rudimentary polar capsule closely resembled the spore morphology of Myxobolus toyamai from Cy. carpio or Carassius gibelio in Japan, China, and the USA. However, the isolate formed a clade with Myxobolus longisporus from Cy. rubrofuscus in China rather than with M. toyamai isolates (nucleotide identities less than 97.9% with known species). Another new species, Myxobolus ginbuna n. sp., from two individuals of Ca. langsdorfii had similar-shaped spores to Myxobolus wulii, but the dimensions were smaller (11.7–13.9 μm by 8.5–9.8 μm vs. 17.6–18.5 μm by 8.9–10.0 μm). This new species formed a clade with M. wulii but was distinct from any of the M. wulii isolates from Ca. gibelio in China (nucleotide identities less than 99.1%). An additional species, Myxobolus pyramidis, from six individuals of Ca. langsdorfii was morphologically and genetically similar to the previous record from Ca. gibelio in China (99.6% nucleotide identity of the 18S rDNA). Two of these six individuals were mix-infected with M. ginbuna n. sp. This is a new host and geographical distribution record for M. pyramidis.

Journal

Parasitology ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 5, 2017

References

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