Formal vs. Informal Use of Television and Sex-Role Stereotyping in Hong Kong

Formal vs. Informal Use of Television and Sex-Role Stereotyping in Hong Kong This study examines the relationship between media use and gender stereotyping in Hong Kong, where Western liberal thoughts meet Chinese traditional and patriarchal norms. Although mainstream media studies center on the general impact of television on sex-role stereotyping, this study distinguishes the formal use of television for information from the informal use for entertainment, the latter of which is often neglected, but the impact is far more encompassing. A baseline survey on gender equality commissioned by the Hong Kong Government with 2,020 successful face-to-face interviews was conducted and the sample was of the Equal Probability of Selection Method (EPSEM) type provided by the Census and Statistics Department. The participants are all Chinese from all class strata (51.5% below HK$10,000; 39.4% between HK$10,000 and HK$24,999; and 19.1% above HK$25,000 with US$1 ∼ HK$7.8). The BSRI measurement was modified to gauge the gender-role stereotype. The results show that despite influence by Western culture, gender stereotyping of the public in Hong Kong still exists. In particular, the self-reported functional television for entertainment (rather than for information) as well as exposure to entertainment programs on television have reinforced the female stereotypes, and females have a lower cultural awareness toward male stereotypes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Formal vs. Informal Use of Television and Sex-Role Stereotyping in Hong Kong

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1007032227501
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between media use and gender stereotyping in Hong Kong, where Western liberal thoughts meet Chinese traditional and patriarchal norms. Although mainstream media studies center on the general impact of television on sex-role stereotyping, this study distinguishes the formal use of television for information from the informal use for entertainment, the latter of which is often neglected, but the impact is far more encompassing. A baseline survey on gender equality commissioned by the Hong Kong Government with 2,020 successful face-to-face interviews was conducted and the sample was of the Equal Probability of Selection Method (EPSEM) type provided by the Census and Statistics Department. The participants are all Chinese from all class strata (51.5% below HK$10,000; 39.4% between HK$10,000 and HK$24,999; and 19.1% above HK$25,000 with US$1 ∼ HK$7.8). The BSRI measurement was modified to gauge the gender-role stereotype. The results show that despite influence by Western culture, gender stereotyping of the public in Hong Kong still exists. In particular, the self-reported functional television for entertainment (rather than for information) as well as exposure to entertainment programs on television have reinforced the female stereotypes, and females have a lower cultural awareness toward male stereotypes.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

References

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