Foreword: challenges of demographics

Foreword: challenges of demographics Popul Res Policy Rev (2006) 25:409–410 DOI 10.1007/s11113-006-9012-7 Georg Schu ¨ tte Received: 11 March 2005 / Accepted: 24 April 2006 / Published online: 18 January 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Germany’s future is gray. According to demographic projections every fourth German as opposed to every sixth German currently will be age 65 or in 2030. For many years, German society has been unable to maintain its reproduction rate. On average, German women of childbearing age have 1.3 children—otherwise known as the fertility rate. To keep the German population at its current level, however, the fertility rate will have to increase to 2.1 children. Similar developments can be seen in many other industrial and post-industrial societies. They all face the challenge of inverting age pyramids. Peace, prosperity, and medical advance have led to longer life expectancies while at the same time birth rates continue to decline. This demographic development will create new challenges to modern societies. The provisions of the European welfare state, for example, with its elaborate social security systems, have to adapt to these new realities. In 2003, the German–American Fulbright Commission focused its German Studies Seminar on the ‘‘Challenges of Demographics.’’ Twenty-four American university faculty http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Foreword: challenges of demographics

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11113-006-9012-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Popul Res Policy Rev (2006) 25:409–410 DOI 10.1007/s11113-006-9012-7 Georg Schu ¨ tte Received: 11 March 2005 / Accepted: 24 April 2006 / Published online: 18 January 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007 Germany’s future is gray. According to demographic projections every fourth German as opposed to every sixth German currently will be age 65 or in 2030. For many years, German society has been unable to maintain its reproduction rate. On average, German women of childbearing age have 1.3 children—otherwise known as the fertility rate. To keep the German population at its current level, however, the fertility rate will have to increase to 2.1 children. Similar developments can be seen in many other industrial and post-industrial societies. They all face the challenge of inverting age pyramids. Peace, prosperity, and medical advance have led to longer life expectancies while at the same time birth rates continue to decline. This demographic development will create new challenges to modern societies. The provisions of the European welfare state, for example, with its elaborate social security systems, have to adapt to these new realities. In 2003, the German–American Fulbright Commission focused its German Studies Seminar on the ‘‘Challenges of Demographics.’’ Twenty-four American university faculty

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 18, 2007

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