Foreword. A path towards agricultural productivity: cereal genomics

Foreword. A path towards agricultural productivity: cereal genomics Plant Molecular Biology 48: 443–444, 2002. Foreword by F. Salamini A path towards agricultural productivity: cereal genomics A personal view In the world, cereals are the most cultivated plants: they produce 60% of the calories and proteins that humans use in their diets. This is only one, but the most important, of the reasons justifying enthusiastic support for any type of research dedicated to cultivated grasses. In the era of genomics, the availability of DNA data stored in databases facilitates the preparation of all manner of research proposals: from gene knock-out systems to the sys- tematic search for protein interactions, to molecular marker-based projects, thus exploring and covering all possible ‘-omics’. In a situation of limited financial resources, the problem is that research on plants has to compete with research on other organisms, and cereals with other crop or model species to secure support for basic and applied activities. It is paradoxical that what nature has contrived in preventing the easy adoption of cereal crops as models for genomic studies - their large complement of repeated DNA sequences - it has made up for by conserving a large degree of interspecific and intergeneric synteny in chromosomal organisation in the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Foreword. A path towards agricultural productivity: cereal genomics

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1014897001088
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Plant Molecular Biology 48: 443–444, 2002. Foreword by F. Salamini A path towards agricultural productivity: cereal genomics A personal view In the world, cereals are the most cultivated plants: they produce 60% of the calories and proteins that humans use in their diets. This is only one, but the most important, of the reasons justifying enthusiastic support for any type of research dedicated to cultivated grasses. In the era of genomics, the availability of DNA data stored in databases facilitates the preparation of all manner of research proposals: from gene knock-out systems to the sys- tematic search for protein interactions, to molecular marker-based projects, thus exploring and covering all possible ‘-omics’. In a situation of limited financial resources, the problem is that research on plants has to compete with research on other organisms, and cereals with other crop or model species to secure support for basic and applied activities. It is paradoxical that what nature has contrived in preventing the easy adoption of cereal crops as models for genomic studies - their large complement of repeated DNA sequences - it has made up for by conserving a large degree of interspecific and intergeneric synteny in chromosomal organisation in the

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 13, 2004

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