Food Addiction and Its Potential Links with Weight Stigma

Food Addiction and Its Potential Links with Weight Stigma Purpose of Review Weight stigma and discrimination are significant issues facing people who are overweight. There is growing acceptance that obesity is caused by a neurobiologically driven addiction to some foods. This review examines the evidence that obesity is due to a food addiction and the impact that this may have on attitudes towards excess weight. Recent Findings There is limited evidence that food addiction explanations may reduce external stigma and self-blame. However, these positives may come at the expense of adverse impacts on overweight person’s self-efficacy and eating. The “addict” label may also further exacerbate weight stigma. Summary Current research on the impact of food addiction explanations on stigma is scarce and inconsistent. There is almost no research examining the clinical impact of food addiction on self-efficacy, eating, or treatment seeking. More research clarifying these issues is essential given the growing acceptance of “food addiction” explanations in society. . . . . . Keywords Food addiction Obesity Stigma Weight bias Discrimination Self-efficacy Introduction [5], portion sizes [6], and the availability of highly processed hyperpalatable foods, particularly those high in refined sugars There are an estimated 1.9 billion adults worldwide who are and fats [7]. Yet despite the high http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Addiction Reports Springer Journals

Food Addiction and Its Potential Links with Weight Stigma

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Neurology
eISSN
2196-2952
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40429-018-0205-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review Weight stigma and discrimination are significant issues facing people who are overweight. There is growing acceptance that obesity is caused by a neurobiologically driven addiction to some foods. This review examines the evidence that obesity is due to a food addiction and the impact that this may have on attitudes towards excess weight. Recent Findings There is limited evidence that food addiction explanations may reduce external stigma and self-blame. However, these positives may come at the expense of adverse impacts on overweight person’s self-efficacy and eating. The “addict” label may also further exacerbate weight stigma. Summary Current research on the impact of food addiction explanations on stigma is scarce and inconsistent. There is almost no research examining the clinical impact of food addiction on self-efficacy, eating, or treatment seeking. More research clarifying these issues is essential given the growing acceptance of “food addiction” explanations in society. . . . . . Keywords Food addiction Obesity Stigma Weight bias Discrimination Self-efficacy Introduction [5], portion sizes [6], and the availability of highly processed hyperpalatable foods, particularly those high in refined sugars There are an estimated 1.9 billion adults worldwide who are and fats [7]. Yet despite the high

Journal

Current Addiction ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 23, 2018

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