Fluoxetine Inhibits K+ Transport Pathways (K+ Efflux, Na+-K+-2Cl− Cotransport, and Na+ Pump) Underlying Volume Regulation in Corneal Endothelial Cells

Fluoxetine Inhibits K+ Transport Pathways (K+ Efflux, Na+-K+-2Cl− Cotransport, and Na+ Pump)... We have studied regulatory volume responses of cultured bovine corneal endothelial cells (CBCEC) using light scattering. We assessed the contributions of fluoxetine (Prozac) and bumetanide-sensitive membrane ion transport pathways to such responses by determining K+ efflux and influx. Cells swollen by a 20% hypo-osmotic solution underwent a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response, which after 6 min restored relative cell volume by 98%. Fluoxetine inhibited RVD recovery; 20 μm by 26%, and 50 μm totally. Fluoxetine had a triphasic effect on K+ efflux; from 20 to 100 μm it inhibited efflux 2-fold, whereas at higher concentrations the efflux first increased to 1.5-fold above the control value, and then decreased again. Cells shrunk by a 20% hyperosmotic solution underwent a regulatory volume increase (RVI) which also after 6 min restored the cell volume by 99%. Fluoxetine inhibited RVI; 20 μm by 25%, and 50 μm completely. Bumetanide (1 μm) inhibited RVI by 43%. In a Cl−-free medium, fluoxetine (50–500 μm) progressively inhibited bumetanide-insensitive K+ influx. The inhibitions of RVI and K+ influx induced by fluoxetine 20 to 50 μm were similar to those induced by 1 μm bumetanide and by Cl−-free medium. A computer simulation suggests that fluoxetine can interact with the selectivity filter of K+ channels. The data suggest that CBCEC can mediate RVD and RVI in part through increases in K+ efflux and Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) activity. Interestingly, the data also suggest that fluoxetine at 20 to 50 μm inhibits NKCC, and at 100–1000 μm inhibits the Na+ pump. One possible explanation for these findings is that fluoxetine could interact with K+-selective sites in K+ channels, the NKC cotransporter and the Na+ pump. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Fluoxetine Inhibits K+ Transport Pathways (K+ Efflux, Na+-K+-2Cl− Cotransport, and Na+ Pump) Underlying Volume Regulation in Corneal Endothelial Cells

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © Inc. by 1999 Springer-Verlag New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Human Physiology
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s002329900560
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We have studied regulatory volume responses of cultured bovine corneal endothelial cells (CBCEC) using light scattering. We assessed the contributions of fluoxetine (Prozac) and bumetanide-sensitive membrane ion transport pathways to such responses by determining K+ efflux and influx. Cells swollen by a 20% hypo-osmotic solution underwent a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response, which after 6 min restored relative cell volume by 98%. Fluoxetine inhibited RVD recovery; 20 μm by 26%, and 50 μm totally. Fluoxetine had a triphasic effect on K+ efflux; from 20 to 100 μm it inhibited efflux 2-fold, whereas at higher concentrations the efflux first increased to 1.5-fold above the control value, and then decreased again. Cells shrunk by a 20% hyperosmotic solution underwent a regulatory volume increase (RVI) which also after 6 min restored the cell volume by 99%. Fluoxetine inhibited RVI; 20 μm by 25%, and 50 μm completely. Bumetanide (1 μm) inhibited RVI by 43%. In a Cl−-free medium, fluoxetine (50–500 μm) progressively inhibited bumetanide-insensitive K+ influx. The inhibitions of RVI and K+ influx induced by fluoxetine 20 to 50 μm were similar to those induced by 1 μm bumetanide and by Cl−-free medium. A computer simulation suggests that fluoxetine can interact with the selectivity filter of K+ channels. The data suggest that CBCEC can mediate RVD and RVI in part through increases in K+ efflux and Na-K-2Cl cotransport (NKCC) activity. Interestingly, the data also suggest that fluoxetine at 20 to 50 μm inhibits NKCC, and at 100–1000 μm inhibits the Na+ pump. One possible explanation for these findings is that fluoxetine could interact with K+-selective sites in K+ channels, the NKC cotransporter and the Na+ pump.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 1999

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