First-order qualitative spatial representation languages with convexity

First-order qualitative spatial representation languages with convexity In recent years, there has been considerable interest within the AI community in qualitative descriptions of space. The idea is that a language in which we can say such things as “region a is convex” or “region b is a part of region c” might be sufficient for characterizing useful properties of everyday spatial arrangements, while avoiding complex and error-sensitive numerical coordinate descriptions. However, such qualitative representation languages are inevitably balanced on a semantic knife-edge: too little expressiveness, and they are useless for the everyday tasks we want them for; too much, and they exhibit the over-precision which motivated qualitative representation languages in the first place. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how sharp that knife-edge is, and thus to establish some limits on what such qualitative spatial description languages might be like. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Cognition and Computation Springer Journals

First-order qualitative spatial representation languages with convexity

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/first-order-qualitative-spatial-representation-languages-with-iVuQN0Z0Kr
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Psychology; Cognitive Psychology
ISSN
1387-5868
eISSN
1573-9252
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1010037123582
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In recent years, there has been considerable interest within the AI community in qualitative descriptions of space. The idea is that a language in which we can say such things as “region a is convex” or “region b is a part of region c” might be sufficient for characterizing useful properties of everyday spatial arrangements, while avoiding complex and error-sensitive numerical coordinate descriptions. However, such qualitative representation languages are inevitably balanced on a semantic knife-edge: too little expressiveness, and they are useless for the everyday tasks we want them for; too much, and they exhibit the over-precision which motivated qualitative representation languages in the first place. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how sharp that knife-edge is, and thus to establish some limits on what such qualitative spatial description languages might be like.

Journal

Spatial Cognition and ComputationSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 30, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off