Financing the entrepreneurial decision: an empirical approach using experimental data on risk attitudes

Financing the entrepreneurial decision: an empirical approach using experimental data on risk... This paper empirically examines the role of personal capital in the entry decision for US high-technology entrepreneurs. Our innovative approach utilizes both survey data and data from economics-based field experiments, which enables us to elicit and control for the risk attitudes of individual entrepreneurs in the study. Empirical findings suggest that (1) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants, (2) credit cards, and (3) earnings from a salaried job are among the most important sources of funds for entrepreneurs in their decision to start up a firm. Our findings support Evans and Jovanovic (Journal of Political Economy 97(4):808–827, 1989) in that wealth appears to have a positive impact on the probability of starting up a firm, even when controlling for risk attitudes; however, risk attitudes do not appear to have a strong role to play in the entry decision overall. Policy implications suggest that firm start-ups are dependent on access to capital in both initial and early stages of development, and that government funding, including SBIR grants, is an important source of capital for potential and nascent high-technology entrepreneurs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Small Business Economics Springer Journals

Financing the entrepreneurial decision: an empirical approach using experimental data on risk attitudes

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Subject
Business and Management; Management; Microeconomics; Entrepreneurship; Industrial Organization
ISSN
0921-898X
eISSN
1573-0913
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11187-009-9210-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper empirically examines the role of personal capital in the entry decision for US high-technology entrepreneurs. Our innovative approach utilizes both survey data and data from economics-based field experiments, which enables us to elicit and control for the risk attitudes of individual entrepreneurs in the study. Empirical findings suggest that (1) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants, (2) credit cards, and (3) earnings from a salaried job are among the most important sources of funds for entrepreneurs in their decision to start up a firm. Our findings support Evans and Jovanovic (Journal of Political Economy 97(4):808–827, 1989) in that wealth appears to have a positive impact on the probability of starting up a firm, even when controlling for risk attitudes; however, risk attitudes do not appear to have a strong role to play in the entry decision overall. Policy implications suggest that firm start-ups are dependent on access to capital in both initial and early stages of development, and that government funding, including SBIR grants, is an important source of capital for potential and nascent high-technology entrepreneurs.

Journal

Small Business EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2009

References

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