Factors Predicting the Recovery of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis After Thyroidectomy

Factors Predicting the Recovery of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis After Thyroidectomy Background We used voice analysis and clinicopathological factors to explore the prognosis of unilateral vocal fold paralysis after thyroid surgery. Methods The medical records of 63 females who developed unilateral vocal fold paralysis after thyroidectomy were reviewed. All patients were divided into two groups: those who recovered from vocal fold paralysis and those who did not. We analyzed clinical parameters and voice analysis results in a search for correlations with recovery from paralysis. Results Of the 63 patients, 37 (58%) recovered from paralysis. A small tumor size, incomplete paralysis, the absence of arytenoid tilting, no compensatory movement of the normal side, lower postoperative shimmer, a higher post- operative maximum phonation time (MPT), and lower postoperative subglottic pressure correlated significantly with recovery from vocal fold paralysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the absence of compensatory movement of the normal side on videostroboscopy was independently prognostic. A postoperative MPT of 6.86 appeared to be optimal for prediction of recovery. Most patients recovered within 6 months, but those with incomplete paralysis recovered about 3 months earlier. At the 12-month follow-up, the thyroidectomy-related voice questionnaire scores had returned to preoperative values in only 12 patients (19.0%); 51 patients (81.0%) did not fully recover. Conclusion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png World Journal of Surgery Springer Journals

Factors Predicting the Recovery of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis After Thyroidectomy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/factors-predicting-the-recovery-of-unilateral-vocal-fold-paralysis-JQKc70AwhG
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Société Internationale de Chirurgie
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Surgery; Abdominal Surgery; Cardiac Surgery; General Surgery; Thoracic Surgery; Vascular Surgery
ISSN
0364-2313
eISSN
1432-2323
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00268-017-4440-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background We used voice analysis and clinicopathological factors to explore the prognosis of unilateral vocal fold paralysis after thyroid surgery. Methods The medical records of 63 females who developed unilateral vocal fold paralysis after thyroidectomy were reviewed. All patients were divided into two groups: those who recovered from vocal fold paralysis and those who did not. We analyzed clinical parameters and voice analysis results in a search for correlations with recovery from paralysis. Results Of the 63 patients, 37 (58%) recovered from paralysis. A small tumor size, incomplete paralysis, the absence of arytenoid tilting, no compensatory movement of the normal side, lower postoperative shimmer, a higher post- operative maximum phonation time (MPT), and lower postoperative subglottic pressure correlated significantly with recovery from vocal fold paralysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that the absence of compensatory movement of the normal side on videostroboscopy was independently prognostic. A postoperative MPT of 6.86 appeared to be optimal for prediction of recovery. Most patients recovered within 6 months, but those with incomplete paralysis recovered about 3 months earlier. At the 12-month follow-up, the thyroidectomy-related voice questionnaire scores had returned to preoperative values in only 12 patients (19.0%); 51 patients (81.0%) did not fully recover. Conclusion

Journal

World Journal of SurgerySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 30, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off