Factors Predicting Risk for PTSD Among Highly Exposed Civilians: Two Longitudinal Studies

Factors Predicting Risk for PTSD Among Highly Exposed Civilians: Two Longitudinal Studies The impact of exposure to constant, prolonged, life threatening, war-related stress is understudied. Previous studies did not examine stressors with an objective history of exposure to a traumatic event such as armed conflict. A set of predictors were assessed in two longitudinal studies. The studies included a civilian population (Study 1, N = 194; Study 2, N = 26) that was exposed to war-related stress. Both groups had a documented objective history of the stressor. A set of logistic regression models in Study 1 and an hierarchical multiple regression in Study 2 were conducted in order to assess the relationship between various predictors from the aforementioned domains and PTSD symptoms. In Study 1, having an elevated risk for clinical level of ASD led to a higher probability of elevated risk for clinical level of PTSD (odds ratio = 7.772, 95 % CI 1.225–49.300; p < .01). Similar results were found in Study 2, where ASD symptoms were the best predictor of PTSD symptoms (standardized β = .644; t = 3.183; p < .01). Whereas ASD was a moderate predictor of PTSD in studies which focused mainly on the impact of a single traumatic event, ASD was a major and potent predictor of PTSD in the current studies which focused on prolonged traumatic exposure to war-related stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Psychiatric Quarterly Springer Journals

Factors Predicting Risk for PTSD Among Highly Exposed Civilians: Two Longitudinal Studies

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Public Health; Sociology, general
ISSN
0033-2720
eISSN
1573-6709
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11126-014-9323-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The impact of exposure to constant, prolonged, life threatening, war-related stress is understudied. Previous studies did not examine stressors with an objective history of exposure to a traumatic event such as armed conflict. A set of predictors were assessed in two longitudinal studies. The studies included a civilian population (Study 1, N = 194; Study 2, N = 26) that was exposed to war-related stress. Both groups had a documented objective history of the stressor. A set of logistic regression models in Study 1 and an hierarchical multiple regression in Study 2 were conducted in order to assess the relationship between various predictors from the aforementioned domains and PTSD symptoms. In Study 1, having an elevated risk for clinical level of ASD led to a higher probability of elevated risk for clinical level of PTSD (odds ratio = 7.772, 95 % CI 1.225–49.300; p < .01). Similar results were found in Study 2, where ASD symptoms were the best predictor of PTSD symptoms (standardized β = .644; t = 3.183; p < .01). Whereas ASD was a moderate predictor of PTSD in studies which focused mainly on the impact of a single traumatic event, ASD was a major and potent predictor of PTSD in the current studies which focused on prolonged traumatic exposure to war-related stress.

Journal

Psychiatric QuarterlySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 30, 2014

References

  • Impact of war stress on posttraumatic stress symptoms in hospital personnel
    Ben-Ezra, M; Palgi, Y; Essar, N
  • The effect of prolong exposure to war stress on the comorbidity of PTSD and depression among hospital personnel
    Palgi, Y; Ben-Ezra, M; Langer, S; Essar, N
  • Smoking, traumatic event exposure, and post-traumatic stress: A critical review of the empirical literature
    Feldner, MT; Babson, KA; Zvolensky, MJ
  • A review of acute stress disorder in DSM-5
    Bryant, RA; Friedman, MJ; Spiegel, D; Ursano, R; Strain, J
  • Identifying PTSD in primary care: Comparison of the Primary Care-PTSD screen (PC-PTSD) and the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ)
    Ouimette, P; Wade, M; Prins, A; Schohn, M
  • Psychometric properties of the PTSD checklist (PCL)
    Blanchard, EB; Jones-Alexander, J; Buckley, TC; Forneris, CA
  • Psychometric properties of the impact of event scale – revised
    Creamer, M; Bell, R; Failla, S

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