Extraction and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Cellulose from Cassava Bagasse

Extraction and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Cellulose from Cassava Bagasse The objective of this study was to produce highly crystalline nanocellulose from cassava bagasse, which is a by-product from the cassava starch industry that contains 15 to 50 wt% cellulose fibers. For this purpose, the lignocellulosic fiber that was isolated from cassava bagasse was bleached with sodium chlorite and hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid. The obtained suspension was spray-dried and the resulting microparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry to determine the crystallinity index. Microcrystalline cellulose was subjected to the same processing conditions and considered as a reference. The crystallinity index of the nanocellulose extracted from the cassava bagasse was higher than the crystallinity index of the nanocellulose extracted from the microcrystalline cellulose; 84.1 and 78.7%, respectively. No other studies have reported cellulose nanocrystals from cassava bagasse with a high crystallinity index. The nanocrystalline cellulose produced in this study is very promising for use in innovative industrial applications. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Polymers and the Environment Springer Journals

Extraction and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Cellulose from Cassava Bagasse

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Chemistry; Polymer Sciences; Environmental Chemistry; Materials Science, general; Environmental Engineering/Biotechnology; Industrial Chemistry/Chemical Engineering
ISSN
1566-2543
eISSN
1572-8900
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10924-017-0983-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The objective of this study was to produce highly crystalline nanocellulose from cassava bagasse, which is a by-product from the cassava starch industry that contains 15 to 50 wt% cellulose fibers. For this purpose, the lignocellulosic fiber that was isolated from cassava bagasse was bleached with sodium chlorite and hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid. The obtained suspension was spray-dried and the resulting microparticles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry to determine the crystallinity index. Microcrystalline cellulose was subjected to the same processing conditions and considered as a reference. The crystallinity index of the nanocellulose extracted from the cassava bagasse was higher than the crystallinity index of the nanocellulose extracted from the microcrystalline cellulose; 84.1 and 78.7%, respectively. No other studies have reported cellulose nanocrystals from cassava bagasse with a high crystallinity index. The nanocrystalline cellulose produced in this study is very promising for use in innovative industrial applications.

Journal

Journal of Polymers and the EnvironmentSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 20, 2017

References

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