Extracellular electron transfer in acetogenic bacteria and its application for conversion of carbon dioxide into organic compounds

Extracellular electron transfer in acetogenic bacteria and its application for conversion of... Acetogenic bacteria (i.e., acetogens) produce acetate from CO2 during anaerobic chemoautotrophic growth. Because acetogens fix CO2 with high energy efficiency, they have been investigated as biocatalysts of CO2 conversion into valuable chemicals. Recent studies revealed that some acetogens are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET), which enables electron exchange between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Thus, acetogens are promising candidates as biocatalysts in recently developed bioelectrochemical technologies, including microbial electrosynthesis (MES), in which useful chemicals are biologically produced from CO2 using electricity as the energy source. In microbial photoelectrosynthesis, a variant of MES technology, the conversion of CO2 into organic compounds is achieved using light as the sole energy source without an external power supply. In this mini-review, we introduce the general features of bioproduction and EET of acetogens and describe recent progress and future prospects of MES technologies based on the EET capability of acetogens. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Springer Journals

Extracellular electron transfer in acetogenic bacteria and its application for conversion of carbon dioxide into organic compounds

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Biotechnology
ISSN
0175-7598
eISSN
1432-0614
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00253-017-8421-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acetogenic bacteria (i.e., acetogens) produce acetate from CO2 during anaerobic chemoautotrophic growth. Because acetogens fix CO2 with high energy efficiency, they have been investigated as biocatalysts of CO2 conversion into valuable chemicals. Recent studies revealed that some acetogens are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET), which enables electron exchange between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Thus, acetogens are promising candidates as biocatalysts in recently developed bioelectrochemical technologies, including microbial electrosynthesis (MES), in which useful chemicals are biologically produced from CO2 using electricity as the energy source. In microbial photoelectrosynthesis, a variant of MES technology, the conversion of CO2 into organic compounds is achieved using light as the sole energy source without an external power supply. In this mini-review, we introduce the general features of bioproduction and EET of acetogens and describe recent progress and future prospects of MES technologies based on the EET capability of acetogens.

Journal

Applied Microbiology and BiotechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 26, 2017

References

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