Expression of genes encoding sucrose synthase isoforms during anomalous xylogenesis in Karelian birch

Expression of genes encoding sucrose synthase isoforms during anomalous xylogenesis in Karelian... Activity of sucrose synthase (SS) and the transcript levels for SS-encoding genes SUS1, SUS2, and SUS3 were assayed during xylogenesis in two varieties of silver birch: common birch (Betula pendula Roth var. pendula) and Karelian birch (B. pendula var. carelica (Mercklin)). The xylem specimens of Karelian birch were sampled from the trunks with the “normal” wood structure (unpatterned trees) and from the trunks of patterned trees in stem regions exhibiting patterned and unpatterned wood. In the period of high cambial activity, the SS activity in common silver birch was elevated due to expression of SuSy1 isoform (SUS1 gene). The UDP-glucose produced in these trees was largely used for cellulose synthesis in cell walls of conducting vessels and fibers that are the main wood constituents in these plants. In Karelian birch, the patterned wood with abundant parenchymal cells was formed on the background of a substantial decrease in expression of SUS1 and SUS2 genes, inhibition of SS activity, and lowering the cellulose content per unit tissue weight. Within the same trees of Karelian birch, the unpatterned wood regions containing numerous conducting vessels and fibers were formed on the background of high expression of SUS1 and SUS2 genes, elevated SS activity, and substantial accumulation of cellulose and starch. The unpatterned plants of Karelian birch occupied intermediate position in terms of SS activity and cellulose content between the common birch and Karelian birch trees with the patterned wood. The results shed new light on the role of SS in the induction of structural anomalies in the wood of Karelian birch. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Plant Physiology Springer Journals

Expression of genes encoding sucrose synthase isoforms during anomalous xylogenesis in Karelian birch

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/expression-of-genes-encoding-sucrose-synthase-isoforms-during-9nte5QZdaJ
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Physiology; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1021-4437
eISSN
1608-3407
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1021443717030104
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Activity of sucrose synthase (SS) and the transcript levels for SS-encoding genes SUS1, SUS2, and SUS3 were assayed during xylogenesis in two varieties of silver birch: common birch (Betula pendula Roth var. pendula) and Karelian birch (B. pendula var. carelica (Mercklin)). The xylem specimens of Karelian birch were sampled from the trunks with the “normal” wood structure (unpatterned trees) and from the trunks of patterned trees in stem regions exhibiting patterned and unpatterned wood. In the period of high cambial activity, the SS activity in common silver birch was elevated due to expression of SuSy1 isoform (SUS1 gene). The UDP-glucose produced in these trees was largely used for cellulose synthesis in cell walls of conducting vessels and fibers that are the main wood constituents in these plants. In Karelian birch, the patterned wood with abundant parenchymal cells was formed on the background of a substantial decrease in expression of SUS1 and SUS2 genes, inhibition of SS activity, and lowering the cellulose content per unit tissue weight. Within the same trees of Karelian birch, the unpatterned wood regions containing numerous conducting vessels and fibers were formed on the background of high expression of SUS1 and SUS2 genes, elevated SS activity, and substantial accumulation of cellulose and starch. The unpatterned plants of Karelian birch occupied intermediate position in terms of SS activity and cellulose content between the common birch and Karelian birch trees with the patterned wood. The results shed new light on the role of SS in the induction of structural anomalies in the wood of Karelian birch.

Journal

Russian Journal of Plant PhysiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 24, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off