Expression of a modified H19 RNA does not cause embryonic lethality in mice

Expression of a modified H19 RNA does not cause embryonic lethality in mice The imprinted H19 gene produces a noncoding RNA of unknown function. Targeted and transgenic mouse mutations have shown that this RNA can be deleted and overexpressed without adverse effect. Yet one mutation of the H19 gene displayed an embryonic lethal phenotype in the mouse—the expression of an RNA modified by a short insertion near the 5′ end of the transcript (H19 Xba allele). Expression of this RNA in transgenic mice conferred lethality at day 14 of development. The potential for this mutant to elucidate the function of the H19 RNA supported further investigation of the H19 Xba phenotype. Since all H19 Xba transgenic founders died as embryos, an experiment was designed to generate H19 Xba -expressing mice that could be maintained as an established line. This strategy took advantage of the maternal-specific expression of H19, passing an H19 Xba knockin allele silently through males and transferring it to females only to generate animals for study. Surprisingly, H19 Xba knockin mice are fully viable, whether the H19 Xba allele is inherited paternally or maternally. Experiments to reproduce the original transgene-based lethality were also performed and yielded live-born transgene-expressing animals. These data demonstrate that, contrary to published reports, expression of the H19 Xba RNA does not cause embryonic lethality in mice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Expression of a modified H19 RNA does not cause embryonic lethality in mice

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/expression-of-a-modified-h19-rna-does-not-cause-embryonic-lethality-in-JcAqw4qT7U
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Anatomy; Zoology; Cell Biology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-005-0092-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The imprinted H19 gene produces a noncoding RNA of unknown function. Targeted and transgenic mouse mutations have shown that this RNA can be deleted and overexpressed without adverse effect. Yet one mutation of the H19 gene displayed an embryonic lethal phenotype in the mouse—the expression of an RNA modified by a short insertion near the 5′ end of the transcript (H19 Xba allele). Expression of this RNA in transgenic mice conferred lethality at day 14 of development. The potential for this mutant to elucidate the function of the H19 RNA supported further investigation of the H19 Xba phenotype. Since all H19 Xba transgenic founders died as embryos, an experiment was designed to generate H19 Xba -expressing mice that could be maintained as an established line. This strategy took advantage of the maternal-specific expression of H19, passing an H19 Xba knockin allele silently through males and transferring it to females only to generate animals for study. Surprisingly, H19 Xba knockin mice are fully viable, whether the H19 Xba allele is inherited paternally or maternally. Experiments to reproduce the original transgene-based lethality were also performed and yielded live-born transgene-expressing animals. These data demonstrate that, contrary to published reports, expression of the H19 Xba RNA does not cause embryonic lethality in mice.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 13, 2006

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off