Exploring the Validity of Behavioral Cues Predictive of Physically Resisting Arrest

Exploring the Validity of Behavioral Cues Predictive of Physically Resisting Arrest Police officers are sometimes trained that certain behavioral cues predict impending violent behavior. Additionally, surveys revealed many hold perceptions that these behavioral predictors of violence are valid, yet empirical evidence of validity is sparse and contra- dictory. The present study used frame-by-frame analysis of videotaped police arrest encounters to explore the validity of nine behavioral cues in predicting whether the arrestee violently resisted arrest. The results revealed that four of the nine behaviors were predictive of violence, yet notable variation occurred across racial groups. The validity of the remaining behavioral cues remains equivocal at this time. . . . . . Keywords Aggression Violence Non-verbal behavior Non-verbal cues Officer safety Pre-attack indicators Over many decades, some police training books and articles that 2001; Hubbard et al. 2002), and by medical patients in a hospital deal with physical dangers to police officers gave the impression setting (Jackson et al. 2014a, b;Roy 2013). While these studies that there were specific human behavioral cues, such as pacing, have supported the validity of some behavioral cues (such as avoiding eye contact, or invading personal space, that law en- assuming a fighter’s stance, invading personal space, and forcement officers could use to predict impending http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology Springer Journals

Exploring the Validity of Behavioral Cues Predictive of Physically Resisting Arrest

Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology , Volume OnlineFirst – Jun 4, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Society for Police and Criminal Psychology
Subject
Psychology; Psychology, general; Law and Psychology; Criminology and Criminal Justice, general
ISSN
0882-0783
eISSN
1936-6469
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11896-018-9280-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Police officers are sometimes trained that certain behavioral cues predict impending violent behavior. Additionally, surveys revealed many hold perceptions that these behavioral predictors of violence are valid, yet empirical evidence of validity is sparse and contra- dictory. The present study used frame-by-frame analysis of videotaped police arrest encounters to explore the validity of nine behavioral cues in predicting whether the arrestee violently resisted arrest. The results revealed that four of the nine behaviors were predictive of violence, yet notable variation occurred across racial groups. The validity of the remaining behavioral cues remains equivocal at this time. . . . . . Keywords Aggression Violence Non-verbal behavior Non-verbal cues Officer safety Pre-attack indicators Over many decades, some police training books and articles that 2001; Hubbard et al. 2002), and by medical patients in a hospital deal with physical dangers to police officers gave the impression setting (Jackson et al. 2014a, b;Roy 2013). While these studies that there were specific human behavioral cues, such as pacing, have supported the validity of some behavioral cues (such as avoiding eye contact, or invading personal space, that law en- assuming a fighter’s stance, invading personal space, and forcement officers could use to predict impending

Journal

Journal of Police and Criminal PsychologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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