Exploring the natural variation for reproductive thermotolerance in wild tomato species

Exploring the natural variation for reproductive thermotolerance in wild tomato species Climate change has become a serious threat for crop productivity worldwide. The increased frequency of heat waves strongly affects reproductive success and thus yield for many crop species, implying that breeding for thermotolerant cultivars is critical for food security. Insight into the genetic architecture of reproductive heat tolerance contributes to our fundamental understanding of the stress sensitivity of this process and at the same time may have applied value. In the case of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), germplasm screenings for thermotolerance have often used yield as the main measured trait. However, due to the complex nature of yield and the relatively narrow genetic variation present in the cultivated germplasm screened, there has been limited progress in understanding the genetic basis of reproductive heat tolerance. Extending the screening to wild accessions of related species that cover a range of climatic conditions might be an effective approach to find novel, more tolerant genetic resources. The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the sensitivity of individual reproductive key traits (i.e. the number of pollen per flower, pollen viability and style protrusion) to heat-wave like long-term mild heat (LTMH), and determine the extent to which genetic variation exists for these traits among wild tomato species. We found that these traits were highly variable among the screened accessions. Although no overall thermotolerant species were identified, several S. pimpinellifolium individuals outperformed the best performing cultivar in terms of pollen viability under LTMH. Furthermore, we reveal that there has been local adaptation of reproductive heat tolerance, as accessions from lower elevations and higher annual temperature are more likely to show high pollen viability under LTMH. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Euphytica Springer Journals

Exploring the natural variation for reproductive thermotolerance in wild tomato species

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Plant Genetics and Genomics; Plant Pathology; Plant Physiology; Biotechnology
ISSN
0014-2336
eISSN
1573-5060
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10681-018-2150-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Climate change has become a serious threat for crop productivity worldwide. The increased frequency of heat waves strongly affects reproductive success and thus yield for many crop species, implying that breeding for thermotolerant cultivars is critical for food security. Insight into the genetic architecture of reproductive heat tolerance contributes to our fundamental understanding of the stress sensitivity of this process and at the same time may have applied value. In the case of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), germplasm screenings for thermotolerance have often used yield as the main measured trait. However, due to the complex nature of yield and the relatively narrow genetic variation present in the cultivated germplasm screened, there has been limited progress in understanding the genetic basis of reproductive heat tolerance. Extending the screening to wild accessions of related species that cover a range of climatic conditions might be an effective approach to find novel, more tolerant genetic resources. The purpose of this study was to provide insight into the sensitivity of individual reproductive key traits (i.e. the number of pollen per flower, pollen viability and style protrusion) to heat-wave like long-term mild heat (LTMH), and determine the extent to which genetic variation exists for these traits among wild tomato species. We found that these traits were highly variable among the screened accessions. Although no overall thermotolerant species were identified, several S. pimpinellifolium individuals outperformed the best performing cultivar in terms of pollen viability under LTMH. Furthermore, we reveal that there has been local adaptation of reproductive heat tolerance, as accessions from lower elevations and higher annual temperature are more likely to show high pollen viability under LTMH.

Journal

EuphyticaSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 13, 2018

References

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