Explicating How Parent–Child Communication Increases Latino and European American Early Adolescents’ Intentions to Intervene in a Friend’s Substance Use

Explicating How Parent–Child Communication Increases Latino and European American Early... This study used primary socialization theory and a focus theory of normative conduct to examine whether anti-substance-use norms mediated targeted parent–child communication against substance (alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana) use’s effects on Latino and European American early adolescents’ intentions to intervene in a friend’s substance use. Further, this study investigated whether familism interacted with targeted parent–child communication to predict anti-substance-use norms, and whether this mediated moderation model functioned differently for Latino and European American early adolescents. Self-reported longitudinal survey data were collected from 6th-8th grade students (N = 627), attending rural IL public schools. Multigroup mediated moderation analyses revealed that as Latino and European American early adolescents engaged in targeted mother–child communication against substance use, they were more likely to develop anti-substance-use parent injunctive norms, and in turn, more likely to report anti-substance-use personal norms. Thus, they were more likely to report that if their friend used substances, they would talk to their friend, seek help from others, and end the friendship. They were, however, less likely to ignore the friend’s substance use. Familism was not a significant moderator, and the hypothesized effects did not differ for Latino and European American early adolescents. The results suggest that parents of Latino and European American adolescents may discourage substance use by engaging in targeted parent–child communication, which may indirectly benefit their children’s friends, as well. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Prevention Science Springer Journals

Explicating How Parent–Child Communication Increases Latino and European American Early Adolescents’ Intentions to Intervene in a Friend’s Substance Use

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Society for Prevention Research
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Health Psychology; Child and School Psychology
ISSN
1389-4986
eISSN
1573-6695
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11121-013-0404-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study used primary socialization theory and a focus theory of normative conduct to examine whether anti-substance-use norms mediated targeted parent–child communication against substance (alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana) use’s effects on Latino and European American early adolescents’ intentions to intervene in a friend’s substance use. Further, this study investigated whether familism interacted with targeted parent–child communication to predict anti-substance-use norms, and whether this mediated moderation model functioned differently for Latino and European American early adolescents. Self-reported longitudinal survey data were collected from 6th-8th grade students (N = 627), attending rural IL public schools. Multigroup mediated moderation analyses revealed that as Latino and European American early adolescents engaged in targeted mother–child communication against substance use, they were more likely to develop anti-substance-use parent injunctive norms, and in turn, more likely to report anti-substance-use personal norms. Thus, they were more likely to report that if their friend used substances, they would talk to their friend, seek help from others, and end the friendship. They were, however, less likely to ignore the friend’s substance use. Familism was not a significant moderator, and the hypothesized effects did not differ for Latino and European American early adolescents. The results suggest that parents of Latino and European American adolescents may discourage substance use by engaging in targeted parent–child communication, which may indirectly benefit their children’s friends, as well.

Journal

Prevention ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: May 22, 2013

References

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