Experimental infection of non-human primates with avian influenza virus (H9N2)

Experimental infection of non-human primates with avian influenza virus (H9N2) Several cases of humans infected with the H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) have been described since 1999; however, the infectivity and pathogenicity of H9N2 in humans is not well defined. A non-human primate model in rhesus macaques was developed to study H9N2 virus infections as a means of better understanding the pathogenesis and virulence of this virus, in addition to testing antiviral drugs. Rhesus macaques inoculated with H9N2 AIV presented with biphasic fever and viral pneumonia. H9N2 was recovered from nasal washes and pharyngeal samples up to days 7-9 postinfection, followed by an increase in HI (hemagglutination inhibition) antibody titers. Tissue tropism and immunohistochemistry indicated that H9N2 AIV replicated in the upper respiratory tract (turbinate, trachea, and bronchus) and in all lobes of the lung. Our data suggest that rhesus macaques are a suitable animal model to study H9N2 influenza virus infections, particularly in the context of viral evolution and pathogenicity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/experimental-infection-of-non-human-primates-with-avian-influenza-07Og59KHuD
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer-Verlag Wien
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-013-1721-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Several cases of humans infected with the H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) have been described since 1999; however, the infectivity and pathogenicity of H9N2 in humans is not well defined. A non-human primate model in rhesus macaques was developed to study H9N2 virus infections as a means of better understanding the pathogenesis and virulence of this virus, in addition to testing antiviral drugs. Rhesus macaques inoculated with H9N2 AIV presented with biphasic fever and viral pneumonia. H9N2 was recovered from nasal washes and pharyngeal samples up to days 7-9 postinfection, followed by an increase in HI (hemagglutination inhibition) antibody titers. Tissue tropism and immunohistochemistry indicated that H9N2 AIV replicated in the upper respiratory tract (turbinate, trachea, and bronchus) and in all lobes of the lung. Our data suggest that rhesus macaques are a suitable animal model to study H9N2 influenza virus infections, particularly in the context of viral evolution and pathogenicity.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 1, 2013

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off