Experimental and predicted adsorption isotherms of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and toluene on activated carbon for industrial applications

Experimental and predicted adsorption isotherms of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and toluene on... Adsorption isotherms for low concentrations (25–100 ppm) of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) on activated carbon were measured at different temperatures (303, 323, and 348 K). In addition, experimental adsorption isotherms for toluene were measured at a single temperature (298 K) and for a wider range of concentrations (5–35,000 ppm) by use of two different gravimetric methods. Because experimental measurements for TMP at low concentrations are time consuming and expensive, it is important to use accurate predictive models capable of taking into account temperature and concentration. In this work, characteristic potential curves for TMP were predicted on the basis of the Polanyi–Dubinin (P–D) model. The curves for TMP were determined by use of a single toluene adsorption isotherm measured at 298 K. For comparison purposes, characteristic curves for TMP were also predicted by use of experimental data for TMP and adsorption isotherms measured at 303, 323, and 348 K. From the characteristic curves, the adsorption isotherms for TMP were then generated at several temperatures (298, 303, 323, and 348 K). The accuracy of the predicted adsorption isotherms were verified by comparison with experimentally measured TMP isotherms. Although the polarity and size of TMP and toluene are slightly different, and despite the different temperatures of the experiments, the P–D model enabled highly accurate prediction of the amount of TMP adsorbed on activated carbon at different temperatures and concentrations. The Langmuir equation was evaluated and shown to work well when used to make predictions within the experimental concentration and temperature ranges. It provided noticeably different estimates when applied to very low concentrations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research on Chemical Intermediates Springer Journals

Experimental and predicted adsorption isotherms of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and toluene on activated carbon for industrial applications

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/experimental-and-predicted-adsorption-isotherms-of-2-2-4-gxqO8Xt1MN
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Chemistry; Catalysis; Physical Chemistry; Inorganic Chemistry
ISSN
0922-6168
eISSN
1568-5675
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11164-013-1271-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Adsorption isotherms for low concentrations (25–100 ppm) of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (TMP) on activated carbon were measured at different temperatures (303, 323, and 348 K). In addition, experimental adsorption isotherms for toluene were measured at a single temperature (298 K) and for a wider range of concentrations (5–35,000 ppm) by use of two different gravimetric methods. Because experimental measurements for TMP at low concentrations are time consuming and expensive, it is important to use accurate predictive models capable of taking into account temperature and concentration. In this work, characteristic potential curves for TMP were predicted on the basis of the Polanyi–Dubinin (P–D) model. The curves for TMP were determined by use of a single toluene adsorption isotherm measured at 298 K. For comparison purposes, characteristic curves for TMP were also predicted by use of experimental data for TMP and adsorption isotherms measured at 303, 323, and 348 K. From the characteristic curves, the adsorption isotherms for TMP were then generated at several temperatures (298, 303, 323, and 348 K). The accuracy of the predicted adsorption isotherms were verified by comparison with experimentally measured TMP isotherms. Although the polarity and size of TMP and toluene are slightly different, and despite the different temperatures of the experiments, the P–D model enabled highly accurate prediction of the amount of TMP adsorbed on activated carbon at different temperatures and concentrations. The Langmuir equation was evaluated and shown to work well when used to make predictions within the experimental concentration and temperature ranges. It provided noticeably different estimates when applied to very low concentrations.

Journal

Research on Chemical IntermediatesSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 20, 2013

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off