Experimental and numerical studies of the stress state at the reverse step joint in heavy timber trusses

Experimental and numerical studies of the stress state at the reverse step joint in heavy timber... Traditional notched joints can be used in timber structures to connect two structural parts under compression loads that concur at a somehow diagonal angle. They can be used to connect the top-chord and the tie-beam of timber trusses, which have been widely in use as roofs in buildings, agricultural and industrial service constructions. Computer-aided manufacturing has again encouraged its use, resulting in an increased demand to improve the knowledge of these assemblies. In this paper, full-scale experimental tests with structural loads and cross-sections were carried out for front notched joint in reverse configuration, also named heel joint, which is commonly used to avoid the tie-beam from standing out of the meeting with the rafter. A monotonic load was applied along the rafter axis by a hydraulic actuator. The skew angle between the pieces was 30°, which is one of the most commonly used in covers solved with heavy timber trusses. Due the large cross-sections used in these trusses, the material used in the tested specimens was glue laminated timber made from Norway spruce. The ultimate force, failure form, and experimental load–strain diagrams were obtained by extensometry. Deformation and displacement values were recorded to validate the models generated by finite elements method. The behaviour observed in the experiments was captured well by the models and allowed for the study of the stress state, the distribution of loads between contact surfaces, the shear stress distribution, and the presence of tensile stress perpendicular to the grain, especially dangerous in this joints. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Materials and Structures Springer Journals

Experimental and numerical studies of the stress state at the reverse step joint in heavy timber trusses

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by RILEM
Subject
Engineering; Structural Mechanics; Materials Science, general; Theoretical and Applied Mechanics; Operating Procedures, Materials Treatment; Civil Engineering; Building Materials
ISSN
1359-5997
eISSN
1871-6873
D.O.I.
10.1617/s11527-018-1144-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traditional notched joints can be used in timber structures to connect two structural parts under compression loads that concur at a somehow diagonal angle. They can be used to connect the top-chord and the tie-beam of timber trusses, which have been widely in use as roofs in buildings, agricultural and industrial service constructions. Computer-aided manufacturing has again encouraged its use, resulting in an increased demand to improve the knowledge of these assemblies. In this paper, full-scale experimental tests with structural loads and cross-sections were carried out for front notched joint in reverse configuration, also named heel joint, which is commonly used to avoid the tie-beam from standing out of the meeting with the rafter. A monotonic load was applied along the rafter axis by a hydraulic actuator. The skew angle between the pieces was 30°, which is one of the most commonly used in covers solved with heavy timber trusses. Due the large cross-sections used in these trusses, the material used in the tested specimens was glue laminated timber made from Norway spruce. The ultimate force, failure form, and experimental load–strain diagrams were obtained by extensometry. Deformation and displacement values were recorded to validate the models generated by finite elements method. The behaviour observed in the experiments was captured well by the models and allowed for the study of the stress state, the distribution of loads between contact surfaces, the shear stress distribution, and the presence of tensile stress perpendicular to the grain, especially dangerous in this joints.

Journal

Materials and StructuresSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 19, 2018

References

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