Evolution of gene orders in mycoplasmas (Bacteria, Firmicutes, Mollicutes)

Evolution of gene orders in mycoplasmas (Bacteria, Firmicutes, Mollicutes) Quantitative methods of estimation of similarity between gene orders have been used to compare the genomes of 14 strains of mycoplasmas and 2 strains of phytoplasmas, i.e., all genomes of bacteria of the class Mollicutes sequenced to date. Reconstructions of the mycoplasma phylogeny based on comparisons of (a) gene orders in a chromosome and (b) nucleotide or amino acid sequences have proved to be almost identical, which confirms that quantitative measures of gene order similarity can be used for meaningful phylogenetic reconstructions. Genomic rearrangements have been almost equally frequent in the evolutions of three main groups of mycoplasmas. A gene order changes by 1% approximately every 7 Myr or less (the calculation is based on the assumption that a 1% change in the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene requires, on average, 50 Myr). In contrast to another analyzed group of obligately parasitic bacteria (rickettsiae), no distinct tendency towards a decrease in the rate of genomic rearrangements has been found in the evolution of mycoplasmas. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Evolution of gene orders in mycoplasmas (Bacteria, Firmicutes, Mollicutes)

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Publisher
SP MAIK Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Biomedicine; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1022795409070035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Quantitative methods of estimation of similarity between gene orders have been used to compare the genomes of 14 strains of mycoplasmas and 2 strains of phytoplasmas, i.e., all genomes of bacteria of the class Mollicutes sequenced to date. Reconstructions of the mycoplasma phylogeny based on comparisons of (a) gene orders in a chromosome and (b) nucleotide or amino acid sequences have proved to be almost identical, which confirms that quantitative measures of gene order similarity can be used for meaningful phylogenetic reconstructions. Genomic rearrangements have been almost equally frequent in the evolutions of three main groups of mycoplasmas. A gene order changes by 1% approximately every 7 Myr or less (the calculation is based on the assumption that a 1% change in the nucleotide sequence of the 16S rRNA gene requires, on average, 50 Myr). In contrast to another analyzed group of obligately parasitic bacteria (rickettsiae), no distinct tendency towards a decrease in the rate of genomic rearrangements has been found in the evolution of mycoplasmas.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 23, 2009

References

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