Evolution of flower shape in Plantago lanceolata

Evolution of flower shape in Plantago lanceolata Plantago lanceolata produces small actinomorphic (radially symmetric), wind-pollinated flowers that have evolved from a zygomorphic, biotically pollinated ancestral state. To understand the developmental mechanisms that might underlie this change in flower shape, and associated change in pollination syndrome, we analyzed the role of CYC-like genes in P. lanceolata. Related zygomorphic species have two CYC-like genes that are expressed asymmetrically in the dorsal region of young floral meristems and in developing flowers, where they affect the rate of development of dorsal petals and stamens. Plantago has a single CYC-like gene (PlCYC) that is not expressed in early floral meristems and there is no apparent asymmetry in the pattern of PlCYC expression during later flower development. Thus, the evolution of actinomorphy in Plantago correlates with loss of dorsal-specific CYC-like gene function. PlCYC is expressed in the inflorescence stem, in pedicels, and relatively late in stamen development, suggesting a novel role for PlCYC in compacting the inflorescence and retarding stamen elongation in this wind pollinated species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Evolution of flower shape in Plantago lanceolata

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Pathology; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-009-9520-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Plantago lanceolata produces small actinomorphic (radially symmetric), wind-pollinated flowers that have evolved from a zygomorphic, biotically pollinated ancestral state. To understand the developmental mechanisms that might underlie this change in flower shape, and associated change in pollination syndrome, we analyzed the role of CYC-like genes in P. lanceolata. Related zygomorphic species have two CYC-like genes that are expressed asymmetrically in the dorsal region of young floral meristems and in developing flowers, where they affect the rate of development of dorsal petals and stamens. Plantago has a single CYC-like gene (PlCYC) that is not expressed in early floral meristems and there is no apparent asymmetry in the pattern of PlCYC expression during later flower development. Thus, the evolution of actinomorphy in Plantago correlates with loss of dorsal-specific CYC-like gene function. PlCYC is expressed in the inflorescence stem, in pedicels, and relatively late in stamen development, suggesting a novel role for PlCYC in compacting the inflorescence and retarding stamen elongation in this wind pollinated species.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 11, 2009

References

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