Evolution of DS-1-like G1P[8] double-gene reassortant rotavirus A strains causing gastroenteritis in children in Vietnam in 2012/2013

Evolution of DS-1-like G1P[8] double-gene reassortant rotavirus A strains causing gastroenteritis... Rotavirus A (RVA) strains, a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children worldwide, commonly possess the Wa or DS-1 genotype constellations. During a hospital-based study conducted in Hanoi, Vietnam, in the 2012-2013 rotavirus season, G1P[8] strains with a virtually identical short RNA migration pattern were detected in 20 (14%) of 141 rotavirus-positive samples. Two representatives of these strains were shown by whole-genome sequencing to be double-gene reassortants possessing the genotype constellation of G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. Sequencing and a database search revealed that these Vietnamese G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains shared an immediate ancestor with a locally circulating G2P[4] strain in all of the inner-capsid and non-structural protein genes, whereas they were more closely related in the VP7 and VP4 genes to a Chinese G1P[8] strain and a Chinese G3P[8] strain, respectively, than to locally circulating G1P[8] strains. Despite the marked similarity between Japanese and Thai G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Vietnamese and Japanese/Thai G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains originated from independent reassortment events. Clinically, children infected with Vietnamese G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains experienced severe diarrhoea, but it was not more severe than that in children infected with ordinary G1P[8] strains. In conclusion, Vietnamese G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains originated from a locally circulating G2P[4] strain and caused severe diarrhoea, but there was no evidence of increased virulence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

Evolution of DS-1-like G1P[8] double-gene reassortant rotavirus A strains causing gastroenteritis in children in Vietnam in 2012/2013

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Publisher
Springer Vienna
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by The Author(s)
Subject
Biomedicine; Virology; Medical Microbiology; Infectious Diseases
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-016-3155-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rotavirus A (RVA) strains, a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children worldwide, commonly possess the Wa or DS-1 genotype constellations. During a hospital-based study conducted in Hanoi, Vietnam, in the 2012-2013 rotavirus season, G1P[8] strains with a virtually identical short RNA migration pattern were detected in 20 (14%) of 141 rotavirus-positive samples. Two representatives of these strains were shown by whole-genome sequencing to be double-gene reassortants possessing the genotype constellation of G1-P[8]-I2-R2-C2-M2-A2-N2-T2-E2-H2. Sequencing and a database search revealed that these Vietnamese G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains shared an immediate ancestor with a locally circulating G2P[4] strain in all of the inner-capsid and non-structural protein genes, whereas they were more closely related in the VP7 and VP4 genes to a Chinese G1P[8] strain and a Chinese G3P[8] strain, respectively, than to locally circulating G1P[8] strains. Despite the marked similarity between Japanese and Thai G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the Vietnamese and Japanese/Thai G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains originated from independent reassortment events. Clinically, children infected with Vietnamese G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains experienced severe diarrhoea, but it was not more severe than that in children infected with ordinary G1P[8] strains. In conclusion, Vietnamese G1P[8] double-gene reassortant strains originated from a locally circulating G2P[4] strain and caused severe diarrhoea, but there was no evidence of increased virulence.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 23, 2016

References

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