Evidence of maternal QTL affecting growth and obesity in adult mice

Evidence of maternal QTL affecting growth and obesity in adult mice Most quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies fail to account for the effect that the maternal genotype may have on an individual’s phenotypes, even though maternal effect QTL have been shown to account for considerable variation in growth and obesity traits in mouse models. Moreover, the fetal programming theory suggests that maternal effects influence an offspring’s adult fitness, although the genetic nature of fetal programming remains unclear. Within this context, our study focused on mapping genomic regions associated with maternal effect QTL by analyzing the phenotypes of chromosomes 2 and 7 subcongenic mice from genetically distinct dams. We analyzed 12 chromosome 2 subcongenic strains that spanned from 70 to 180 Mb with CAST/EiJ donor regions on the background of C57BL/6 J, and 14 chromosome 7 subcongenic strains that spanned from 81 to 111 Mb with BALB/cByJ donor regions on C57BL/6ByJ background. Maternal QTL analyses were performed on the basis of overlapping donor regions between subcongenic strains. We identified several highly significant (P < 5 × 10−4) maternal QTL influencing total body weight, organ weight, and fat pad weights in both sets of subcongenics. These QTL accounted for 1.9-11.7% of the phenotypic variance for growth and obesity and greatly narrowed the genomic regions associated with the maternal genetic effects. These maternal effect QTL controlled phenotypic traits in adult mice, suggesting that maternal influences at early stages of development may permanently affect offspring performance. Identification of maternal effects in our survey of two sets of subcongenic strains, representing approximately 5% of the mouse genome, supports the hypothesis that maternal effects represent significant sources of genetic variation that are largely ignored in genetic studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

Evidence of maternal QTL affecting growth and obesity in adult mice

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/evidence-of-maternal-qtl-affecting-growth-and-obesity-in-adult-mice-Z0EAVBv99G
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by The Author(s)
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology ; Anatomy ; Cell Biology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-009-9182-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies fail to account for the effect that the maternal genotype may have on an individual’s phenotypes, even though maternal effect QTL have been shown to account for considerable variation in growth and obesity traits in mouse models. Moreover, the fetal programming theory suggests that maternal effects influence an offspring’s adult fitness, although the genetic nature of fetal programming remains unclear. Within this context, our study focused on mapping genomic regions associated with maternal effect QTL by analyzing the phenotypes of chromosomes 2 and 7 subcongenic mice from genetically distinct dams. We analyzed 12 chromosome 2 subcongenic strains that spanned from 70 to 180 Mb with CAST/EiJ donor regions on the background of C57BL/6 J, and 14 chromosome 7 subcongenic strains that spanned from 81 to 111 Mb with BALB/cByJ donor regions on C57BL/6ByJ background. Maternal QTL analyses were performed on the basis of overlapping donor regions between subcongenic strains. We identified several highly significant (P < 5 × 10−4) maternal QTL influencing total body weight, organ weight, and fat pad weights in both sets of subcongenics. These QTL accounted for 1.9-11.7% of the phenotypic variance for growth and obesity and greatly narrowed the genomic regions associated with the maternal genetic effects. These maternal effect QTL controlled phenotypic traits in adult mice, suggesting that maternal influences at early stages of development may permanently affect offspring performance. Identification of maternal effects in our survey of two sets of subcongenic strains, representing approximately 5% of the mouse genome, supports the hypothesis that maternal effects represent significant sources of genetic variation that are largely ignored in genetic studies.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 28, 2009

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off