Evidence for and against the 'double penalty' thesis in the science and engineering fields

Evidence for and against the 'double penalty' thesis in the science and engineering fields This study examines how race and gender affect the economic status of scientists and engineers. Using data from the 1989 Survey of Natural and Social Scientists and Engineers, the wage rates of minority females are compared with those of white males, white females, and minority males for the native-born population and immigrants. The results reveal Asian women's parity with white men in some contexts. Economic discrimination holds up for black and white women only. There is also evidence that institutional contexts affect men and women with similar characteristics in different ways. The findings challenge the claim for universalism but offer some support for the discipline-dependence hypothesis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Evidence for and against the 'double penalty' thesis in the science and engineering fields

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/evidence-for-and-against-the-double-penalty-thesis-in-the-science-and-SLAE2bGkU1
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Social Sciences; Demography; Sociology, general; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1005770509422
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines how race and gender affect the economic status of scientists and engineers. Using data from the 1989 Survey of Natural and Social Scientists and Engineers, the wage rates of minority females are compared with those of white males, white females, and minority males for the native-born population and immigrants. The results reveal Asian women's parity with white men in some contexts. Economic discrimination holds up for black and white women only. There is also evidence that institutional contexts affect men and women with similar characteristics in different ways. The findings challenge the claim for universalism but offer some support for the discipline-dependence hypothesis.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 29, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off