Evaluation of Storm Water Surface Runoff and Road Debris as Sources of Water Pollution

Evaluation of Storm Water Surface Runoff and Road Debris as Sources of Water Pollution Street sweeping is regularly performed within cities and residential communities to reduce roadway debris and ensure properly functioning storm water management systems. Given removal of plant and soil debris, street sweeping may also reduce nonpoint source pollution through removal of leachate source material. To assess the influence of street sweeping on storm water pollutants, 36 storm water collection devices were installed within six residential communities in Central Florida and subjected to varying municipal sweeping regimes. Additionally, precipitation and storm water retention pond leachate samplers were installed to quantify pollutant sources that may enter and leave selected urban communities. Despite high variability in percentage of impervious surfaces, population density, and volume of road debris among communities, no significant (P ≤ 0.05) differences were observed for total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), nitrate + nitrite (NOx), and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in storm water among communities or between swept and unswept areas of roadways. Similarly, no significant differences were observed for TKN, NOx, and TP concentrations in precipitation and storm water. Significant differences in orthophosphate (ortho-P), however, were observed between communities and precipitation. Additionally, storm water TP concentrations were greater than discharge estimated to originate from communities within the study area. Although street sweeping may be effective at reducing volume of roadway debris, our data did not find it reduced N or P in storm water. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water, Air, & Soil Pollution Springer Journals

Evaluation of Storm Water Surface Runoff and Road Debris as Sources of Water Pollution

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Water Quality/Water Pollution; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Soil Science & Conservation; Hydrogeology; Climate Change/Climate Change Impacts
ISSN
0049-6979
eISSN
1573-2932
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11270-018-3793-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Street sweeping is regularly performed within cities and residential communities to reduce roadway debris and ensure properly functioning storm water management systems. Given removal of plant and soil debris, street sweeping may also reduce nonpoint source pollution through removal of leachate source material. To assess the influence of street sweeping on storm water pollutants, 36 storm water collection devices were installed within six residential communities in Central Florida and subjected to varying municipal sweeping regimes. Additionally, precipitation and storm water retention pond leachate samplers were installed to quantify pollutant sources that may enter and leave selected urban communities. Despite high variability in percentage of impervious surfaces, population density, and volume of road debris among communities, no significant (P ≤ 0.05) differences were observed for total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), nitrate + nitrite (NOx), and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in storm water among communities or between swept and unswept areas of roadways. Similarly, no significant differences were observed for TKN, NOx, and TP concentrations in precipitation and storm water. Significant differences in orthophosphate (ortho-P), however, were observed between communities and precipitation. Additionally, storm water TP concentrations were greater than discharge estimated to originate from communities within the study area. Although street sweeping may be effective at reducing volume of roadway debris, our data did not find it reduced N or P in storm water.

Journal

Water, Air, & Soil PollutionSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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