Evaluation of growth and phycobiliprotein composition of cyanobacteria isolates cultivated in different nitrogen sources

Evaluation of growth and phycobiliprotein composition of cyanobacteria isolates cultivated in... Phycobiliproteins, light-harvesting pigments found in cyanobacteria and in some eukaryotic algae, have numerous commercial applications in food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Colorant production from cyanobacteria offers advantages over their production from higher plants, as cyanobacteria have fast growth rate and high photosynthetic efficiency and require less space. In this study, three cyanobacteria strains were studied for phycobiliprotein production and the influence of sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate and ammonium chloride on the growth and phycobiliprotein composition of the strains were evaluated. In the batch culture period of 12 days, Phormidium sp. and Pseudoscillatoria sp. were able to utilize all tested nitrogen sources; however, ammonium chloride was the best nitrogen source for both strains to achieve maximum growth rate μ = 0.284 ± 0.03 and μ = 0.274 ± 0.13 day−1, chlorophyll a 16.2 ±  0.5 and 12.2 ±  0.2 mg L−1, and phycobiliprotein contents 19.38 ± 0.09 and 19.99 ± 0.14% of dry weight, whereas, for Arthrospira platensis, the highest growth rate of μ = 0.304 ± 0.0 day−1, chlorophyll a 19.1 ± 0.5 mg L−1, and phycobiliprotein content of 22.27 ± 0.21% of dry weight were achieved with sodium nitrate. The phycocyanin from the lyophilized cyanobacterial biomass was extracted using calcium chloride and food grade purity (A 620/A 280 ratio > 0.7) was achieved. Furthermore, phycocyanin was purified using two-step chromatographic method and the analytical grade purity (A 620/A 280 ratio > 4) was attained. SDS-PAGE demonstrated the purity and presence of two bands corresponding to α- and β-subunits of the C-phycocyanin. The results showed that Phormidium sp. and Pseudoscillatoria sp. could be good candidates for phycocyanin production. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Phycology Springer Journals

Evaluation of growth and phycobiliprotein composition of cyanobacteria isolates cultivated in different nitrogen sources

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Physiology; Ecology
ISSN
0921-8971
eISSN
1573-5176
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10811-018-1398-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Phycobiliproteins, light-harvesting pigments found in cyanobacteria and in some eukaryotic algae, have numerous commercial applications in food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Colorant production from cyanobacteria offers advantages over their production from higher plants, as cyanobacteria have fast growth rate and high photosynthetic efficiency and require less space. In this study, three cyanobacteria strains were studied for phycobiliprotein production and the influence of sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate and ammonium chloride on the growth and phycobiliprotein composition of the strains were evaluated. In the batch culture period of 12 days, Phormidium sp. and Pseudoscillatoria sp. were able to utilize all tested nitrogen sources; however, ammonium chloride was the best nitrogen source for both strains to achieve maximum growth rate μ = 0.284 ± 0.03 and μ = 0.274 ± 0.13 day−1, chlorophyll a 16.2 ±  0.5 and 12.2 ±  0.2 mg L−1, and phycobiliprotein contents 19.38 ± 0.09 and 19.99 ± 0.14% of dry weight, whereas, for Arthrospira platensis, the highest growth rate of μ = 0.304 ± 0.0 day−1, chlorophyll a 19.1 ± 0.5 mg L−1, and phycobiliprotein content of 22.27 ± 0.21% of dry weight were achieved with sodium nitrate. The phycocyanin from the lyophilized cyanobacterial biomass was extracted using calcium chloride and food grade purity (A 620/A 280 ratio > 0.7) was achieved. Furthermore, phycocyanin was purified using two-step chromatographic method and the analytical grade purity (A 620/A 280 ratio > 4) was attained. SDS-PAGE demonstrated the purity and presence of two bands corresponding to α- and β-subunits of the C-phycocyanin. The results showed that Phormidium sp. and Pseudoscillatoria sp. could be good candidates for phycocyanin production.

Journal

Journal of Applied PhycologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 20, 2018

References

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