Evaluation of disinfection by-product formation during chlor(am)ination from algal organic matter after UV irradiation

Evaluation of disinfection by-product formation during chlor(am)ination from algal organic matter... This study evaluated the effect of low-pressure ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from algal organic matter of Microcystis aeruginosa during subsequent chlorination and chloramination. The algal organic matter includes extracellular organic matter (EOM) and intracellular organic matter (IOM). The fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra indicated that the humic/fulvic acid-like organics of EOM and the protein-like organics of IOM may be preferentially degraded by UV treatment. UV irradiation with low specific UV absorbance values was effective in reducing the formation of trihalomethanes and dichloroacetic acid from EOM and IOM during the subsequent chlorination. During the UV-chloramine process, higher UV dose (1000 mJ/cm2) led to the decrease of the formation of dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and haloketones from IOM by an average of 24%. Furthermore, UV irradiation can slightly increase the bromine substitution factors (BSFs) of haloacetic acids from EOM during chlorination, including dihaloacetic acids and trihaloacetic acids in the presence of bromide (50 μg/L). However, UV irradiation did not shift the formation of DBPs from IOM to more brominated species, since the BSFs of trihalomethanes, dihaloacetic acids, trihaloacetic acids, and dihaloacetonitriles almost kept unchanged during UV-chlorine process. As for UV-chloramine process, UV irradiation decreased the BSFs of trihalomethanes, while increased the BSFs of dihaloacetic acid for both EOM and IOM. Overall, the UV pretreatment process is a potential technology in treating algae-rich water. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Evaluation of disinfection by-product formation during chlor(am)ination from algal organic matter after UV irradiation

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-0918-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study evaluated the effect of low-pressure ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from algal organic matter of Microcystis aeruginosa during subsequent chlorination and chloramination. The algal organic matter includes extracellular organic matter (EOM) and intracellular organic matter (IOM). The fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectra indicated that the humic/fulvic acid-like organics of EOM and the protein-like organics of IOM may be preferentially degraded by UV treatment. UV irradiation with low specific UV absorbance values was effective in reducing the formation of trihalomethanes and dichloroacetic acid from EOM and IOM during the subsequent chlorination. During the UV-chloramine process, higher UV dose (1000 mJ/cm2) led to the decrease of the formation of dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and haloketones from IOM by an average of 24%. Furthermore, UV irradiation can slightly increase the bromine substitution factors (BSFs) of haloacetic acids from EOM during chlorination, including dihaloacetic acids and trihaloacetic acids in the presence of bromide (50 μg/L). However, UV irradiation did not shift the formation of DBPs from IOM to more brominated species, since the BSFs of trihalomethanes, dihaloacetic acids, trihaloacetic acids, and dihaloacetonitriles almost kept unchanged during UV-chlorine process. As for UV-chloramine process, UV irradiation decreased the BSFs of trihalomethanes, while increased the BSFs of dihaloacetic acid for both EOM and IOM. Overall, the UV pretreatment process is a potential technology in treating algae-rich water.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 13, 2017

References

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