Ethnic identity, resilience, and well-being: a study of female Maasai migrants

Ethnic identity, resilience, and well-being: a study of female Maasai migrants Objectives Migration is an increasingly prevalent worldwide phenomenon. In recent years, Maasai men and women have migrated from their traditional rural villages to cities in Tanzania in growing numbers. This study explores the experience of rural-to-urban migration among female Maasai migrants and how this experience affects ethnic identity, resilience, and well-being. Methods Thirty-one female Maasai migrants were interviewed in Swahili, Maa, or English. Researchers used a rigorous multi-pass, qualitative coding process to analyze interview transcripts. Results Migration-driving factors, specifically a desire for education (leading to permanent migrants) and a need to support one’s family (resulting in circular migrants), influence how Maasai women adapt and respond to challenges in the city. Circular migrants hold closely to their traditional ethnic identity and remain isolated from city life, while permanent migrants modulate their ethnic identity and integrate into urban society. Conclusions Increasing connections among female Maasai migrants might create a more resilient community leading to improved health. Pilot workshops with this aim are being implemented. Keywords Rural-to-urban migration  Ethnic identity  Resilience  Maasai  Climate change  Education Introduction Global migration patterns Migration is an increasingly prevalent worldwide phe- nomenon, resulting in millions of people leaving their homes and traditional http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Public Health Springer Journals

Ethnic identity, resilience, and well-being: a study of female Maasai migrants

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+)
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Public Health; Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine; Environmental Health
ISSN
1661-8556
eISSN
1661-8564
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00038-018-1124-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objectives Migration is an increasingly prevalent worldwide phenomenon. In recent years, Maasai men and women have migrated from their traditional rural villages to cities in Tanzania in growing numbers. This study explores the experience of rural-to-urban migration among female Maasai migrants and how this experience affects ethnic identity, resilience, and well-being. Methods Thirty-one female Maasai migrants were interviewed in Swahili, Maa, or English. Researchers used a rigorous multi-pass, qualitative coding process to analyze interview transcripts. Results Migration-driving factors, specifically a desire for education (leading to permanent migrants) and a need to support one’s family (resulting in circular migrants), influence how Maasai women adapt and respond to challenges in the city. Circular migrants hold closely to their traditional ethnic identity and remain isolated from city life, while permanent migrants modulate their ethnic identity and integrate into urban society. Conclusions Increasing connections among female Maasai migrants might create a more resilient community leading to improved health. Pilot workshops with this aim are being implemented. Keywords Rural-to-urban migration  Ethnic identity  Resilience  Maasai  Climate change  Education Introduction Global migration patterns Migration is an increasingly prevalent worldwide phe- nomenon, resulting in millions of people leaving their homes and traditional

Journal

International Journal of Public HealthSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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