Ethanol production from Gracilaria fisheri using three marine epiphytic yeast species

Ethanol production from Gracilaria fisheri using three marine epiphytic yeast species Biofuels, especially bioethanol, are renewable resources that can supplement fossil fuel use. Gracilaria fisheri is a major cultivated seaweed in Thailand and can be a potential source of bioethanol due to its high polysaccharide content. Marine yeasts collected from the surface of seaweed are poorly known, but could be a source of fermenting yeast when using seaweeds. We collected samples of G. fisheri cultivated in shrimp pond effluent from southern Thailand and isolated yeasts from their surface. Molecular methods (ITS2 sequence) were used to identify the species and ethanol production was measured using algal powder hydrolyzed with 1 M of H SO as a substrate. These species (Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Kodamaea ohmeri)were 2 4 identify and used in fermentation experiment. These three yeast species produced different amounts of ethanol (per gram sugars) −2 −1 −2 −1 with C. glabrata producing the highest amount (2.5 × 10 gethanol g sugars) and C. parapsilosis (1.70 × 10 gethanol g sugars) the lowest. This study revealed that epiphytic yeasts isolated from G. fisheri have potential for use in the production of ethanol. . . . . . Keywords Gracilaria Ethanol production Epiphytic yeast Candida parapsilosis Candida glabrata Kodamaea ohmeri Introduction environments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Phycology Springer Journals

Ethanol production from Gracilaria fisheri using three marine epiphytic yeast species

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/ethanol-production-from-gracilaria-fisheri-using-three-marine-BkRLF26sLI
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Plant Physiology; Ecology
ISSN
0921-8971
eISSN
1573-5176
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10811-018-1527-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Biofuels, especially bioethanol, are renewable resources that can supplement fossil fuel use. Gracilaria fisheri is a major cultivated seaweed in Thailand and can be a potential source of bioethanol due to its high polysaccharide content. Marine yeasts collected from the surface of seaweed are poorly known, but could be a source of fermenting yeast when using seaweeds. We collected samples of G. fisheri cultivated in shrimp pond effluent from southern Thailand and isolated yeasts from their surface. Molecular methods (ITS2 sequence) were used to identify the species and ethanol production was measured using algal powder hydrolyzed with 1 M of H SO as a substrate. These species (Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Kodamaea ohmeri)were 2 4 identify and used in fermentation experiment. These three yeast species produced different amounts of ethanol (per gram sugars) −2 −1 −2 −1 with C. glabrata producing the highest amount (2.5 × 10 gethanol g sugars) and C. parapsilosis (1.70 × 10 gethanol g sugars) the lowest. This study revealed that epiphytic yeasts isolated from G. fisheri have potential for use in the production of ethanol. . . . . . Keywords Gracilaria Ethanol production Epiphytic yeast Candida parapsilosis Candida glabrata Kodamaea ohmeri Introduction environments.

Journal

Journal of Applied PhycologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off