Estimation of economic and environmental potentials of variable rate versus uniform N fertilizer application to spring barley on morainic soils in SE Norway

Estimation of economic and environmental potentials of variable rate versus uniform N fertilizer... Spring barley was grown for 4 years (2001–2004) in field trials at two sites on morainic soil in central SE Norway, with five N level treatments: 0, 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg N ha-1. Regression analyses showed that a selection of soil properties could explain 95–98% of the spatial yield variation and 47–90% of the yield responses (averaged over years). A strategy with uniform fertilizer application of 120 kg N ha−1 (U N120) was compared with two variable-rate (VR) strategies, with a maximum N rate of either 150 kg N ha−1 (VRN150) or 180 kg N ha−1 (VRN180). These strategies were tested using either Norwegian prices (low price ratio of N fertilizer to yield value; PN/PY), or Swedish prices (high PN/PY). The VRN180 strategy had the highest potential yield and net revenue (yield value minus N cost) at both sites and under both price regimes. Using this strategy with Norwegian prices would increase the profit of barley cropping as long as at least 40 and 31% of the estimated potential increase in net revenue was realized, respectively. Using Swedish prices, uniform application appeared to be as good as or even better economically than the VR methods, when correcting for extra costs of VR application. The environmental effect of VR compared with uniform application, expressed as N not accounted for, showed contrasting effects when using Norwegian prices, but was clearly favourable using Swedish prices, with up to 20% reduction in the amount of N not accounted for. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Estimation of economic and environmental potentials of variable rate versus uniform N fertilizer application to spring barley on morainic soils in SE Norway

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11119-006-9013-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spring barley was grown for 4 years (2001–2004) in field trials at two sites on morainic soil in central SE Norway, with five N level treatments: 0, 60, 90, 120 and 150 kg N ha-1. Regression analyses showed that a selection of soil properties could explain 95–98% of the spatial yield variation and 47–90% of the yield responses (averaged over years). A strategy with uniform fertilizer application of 120 kg N ha−1 (U N120) was compared with two variable-rate (VR) strategies, with a maximum N rate of either 150 kg N ha−1 (VRN150) or 180 kg N ha−1 (VRN180). These strategies were tested using either Norwegian prices (low price ratio of N fertilizer to yield value; PN/PY), or Swedish prices (high PN/PY). The VRN180 strategy had the highest potential yield and net revenue (yield value minus N cost) at both sites and under both price regimes. Using this strategy with Norwegian prices would increase the profit of barley cropping as long as at least 40 and 31% of the estimated potential increase in net revenue was realized, respectively. Using Swedish prices, uniform application appeared to be as good as or even better economically than the VR methods, when correcting for extra costs of VR application. The environmental effect of VR compared with uniform application, expressed as N not accounted for, showed contrasting effects when using Norwegian prices, but was clearly favourable using Swedish prices, with up to 20% reduction in the amount of N not accounted for.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 7, 2006

References

  • Nitrogen mass balances in conventional, integrated and ecological cropping systems and the relationship between balance calculations and nitrogen runoff in an 8-year field experiment
    Korsaeth, A.; Eltun, R.
  • Temporal changes in mineralization and immobilization of N during degradation of plant material: implications for the plant N supply and nitrogen losses
    Korsaeth, A.; Henriksen, T. M.; Bakken, L. R.

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