Escherichia coli Heat Stable (STa) Enterotoxin and the Upper Small Intestine: Lack of Evidence in Vivo for Net Fluid Secretion

Escherichia coli Heat Stable (STa) Enterotoxin and the Upper Small Intestine: Lack of Evidence in... Heat stable (STa) enterotoxin from E. coli reduced fluid absorption in vivo in the perfused jejunum of the anaesthetized rat in Krebs-phosphate buffer containing lactate and glucose (nutrient buffer), in glucose saline and in glucose free saline. Bicarbonate ion enhanced fluid absorption of 98 ± 7 (6) μl/cm/h was very significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced by STa to 19 ± 4 (6) μl/cm/h, but net secretion was not found. When impermeant MES substituted for bicarbonate ion, net fluid absorption of 29 ± 3 (6) μl/cm/h was less (P < 0.01) than the values for phosphate buffer and bicarbonate buffer. With STa in MES buffer, fluid absorption of 3 ± 2 (6) μl/cm/h was less than (P < 0.001) that in the absence of STa and not significantly different from zero net fluid absorption. E. coli STa did not cause net fluid secretion in vivo under any of the above circumstances. Neither bumetanide nor NPPB when co-perfused with STa restored the rate of fluid absorption. In experiments with zero sodium ion-containing perfusates, STa further reduced fluid absorption modestly by 20 μl/cm/h. Perfusion of ethyl-isopropyl-amiloride (EIPA) with STa in zero sodium ion buffers prevented the small increment in fluid entry into the lumen caused by STa, indicating that the STa effect was attributable to residual sodium ion and fluid uptake that zero sodium-ion perfusates did not eradicate. These experiments, using a technique that directly measures mass transport of fluid into and out of the in vivo proximal jejunum, do not support the concept that E. coli STa acts by stimulating a secretory response. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Membrane Biology Springer Journals

Escherichia coli Heat Stable (STa) Enterotoxin and the Upper Small Intestine: Lack of Evidence in Vivo for Net Fluid Secretion

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Human Physiology; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0022-2631
eISSN
1432-1424
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00232-005-0771-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Heat stable (STa) enterotoxin from E. coli reduced fluid absorption in vivo in the perfused jejunum of the anaesthetized rat in Krebs-phosphate buffer containing lactate and glucose (nutrient buffer), in glucose saline and in glucose free saline. Bicarbonate ion enhanced fluid absorption of 98 ± 7 (6) μl/cm/h was very significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced by STa to 19 ± 4 (6) μl/cm/h, but net secretion was not found. When impermeant MES substituted for bicarbonate ion, net fluid absorption of 29 ± 3 (6) μl/cm/h was less (P < 0.01) than the values for phosphate buffer and bicarbonate buffer. With STa in MES buffer, fluid absorption of 3 ± 2 (6) μl/cm/h was less than (P < 0.001) that in the absence of STa and not significantly different from zero net fluid absorption. E. coli STa did not cause net fluid secretion in vivo under any of the above circumstances. Neither bumetanide nor NPPB when co-perfused with STa restored the rate of fluid absorption. In experiments with zero sodium ion-containing perfusates, STa further reduced fluid absorption modestly by 20 μl/cm/h. Perfusion of ethyl-isopropyl-amiloride (EIPA) with STa in zero sodium ion buffers prevented the small increment in fluid entry into the lumen caused by STa, indicating that the STa effect was attributable to residual sodium ion and fluid uptake that zero sodium-ion perfusates did not eradicate. These experiments, using a technique that directly measures mass transport of fluid into and out of the in vivo proximal jejunum, do not support the concept that E. coli STa acts by stimulating a secretory response.

Journal

The Journal of Membrane BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2005

References

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