Epigenetic perspectives of safety in assisted reproductive technologies

Epigenetic perspectives of safety in assisted reproductive technologies To date, a wide range of assisted reproductive technologies is available for patients with impaired fertility. In general, the current methods of reproductive medicine are considered safe and do not significantly increase the frequency of birth of children with diseases or congenital malformations. However, the evidence has been accumulating in literature on higher risk of genomic imprinting diseases (Beckwith-Wiedemann and Angelman syndromes) as a result of using assisted reproductive technologies. In most cases examined, the appearance of these syndromes was explained by defective methylation status of imprinted genes. It has been suggested that manipulations with gametes and embryos during the period of total epigenetic modification of their genomes may act as potential risk factors of assisted reproductive technologies. Moreover, overcoming many natural reproductive barriers may contribute to the development of some pathological phenotypes. The review summarizes current views on epigenetic risk factors associated with assisted reproductive technologies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Epigenetic perspectives of safety in assisted reproductive technologies

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Publisher
Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Pleiades Publishing, Inc.
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Microbial Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1022795407090013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To date, a wide range of assisted reproductive technologies is available for patients with impaired fertility. In general, the current methods of reproductive medicine are considered safe and do not significantly increase the frequency of birth of children with diseases or congenital malformations. However, the evidence has been accumulating in literature on higher risk of genomic imprinting diseases (Beckwith-Wiedemann and Angelman syndromes) as a result of using assisted reproductive technologies. In most cases examined, the appearance of these syndromes was explained by defective methylation status of imprinted genes. It has been suggested that manipulations with gametes and embryos during the period of total epigenetic modification of their genomes may act as potential risk factors of assisted reproductive technologies. Moreover, overcoming many natural reproductive barriers may contribute to the development of some pathological phenotypes. The review summarizes current views on epigenetic risk factors associated with assisted reproductive technologies.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 27, 2007

References

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