Enzyme–substrate relationships in the ubiquitin system: approaches for identifying substrates of ubiquitin ligases

Enzyme–substrate relationships in the ubiquitin system: approaches for identifying substrates... Protein ubiquitylation is an important post-translational modification, regulating aspects of virtually every biochemical pathway in eukaryotic cells. Hundreds of enzymes participate in the conjugation and deconjugation of ubiquitin, as well as the recognition, signaling functions, and degradation of ubiquitylated proteins. Regulation of ubiquitylation is most commonly at the level of recognition of substrates by E3 ubiquitin ligases. Characterization of the network of E3–substrate relationships is a major goal and challenge in the field, as this expected to yield fundamental biological insights and opportunities for drug development. There has been remarkable success in identifying substrates for some E3 ligases, in many instances using the standard protein–protein interaction techniques (e.g., two-hybrid screens and co-immunoprecipitations paired with mass spectrometry). However, some E3s have remained refractory to characterization, while others have simply not yet been studied due to the sheer number and diversity of E3s. This review will discuss the range of tools and techniques that can be used for substrate profiling of E3 ligases. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences Springer Journals

Enzyme–substrate relationships in the ubiquitin system: approaches for identifying substrates of ubiquitin ligases

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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Biomedicine, general; Life Sciences, general; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
1420-682X
eISSN
1420-9071
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00018-017-2529-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Protein ubiquitylation is an important post-translational modification, regulating aspects of virtually every biochemical pathway in eukaryotic cells. Hundreds of enzymes participate in the conjugation and deconjugation of ubiquitin, as well as the recognition, signaling functions, and degradation of ubiquitylated proteins. Regulation of ubiquitylation is most commonly at the level of recognition of substrates by E3 ubiquitin ligases. Characterization of the network of E3–substrate relationships is a major goal and challenge in the field, as this expected to yield fundamental biological insights and opportunities for drug development. There has been remarkable success in identifying substrates for some E3 ligases, in many instances using the standard protein–protein interaction techniques (e.g., two-hybrid screens and co-immunoprecipitations paired with mass spectrometry). However, some E3s have remained refractory to characterization, while others have simply not yet been studied due to the sheer number and diversity of E3s. This review will discuss the range of tools and techniques that can be used for substrate profiling of E3 ligases.

Journal

Cellular and Molecular Life SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 28, 2017

References

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