Enzyme and microbial technology for synthesis of bioactive oligosaccharides: an update

Enzyme and microbial technology for synthesis of bioactive oligosaccharides: an update Oligosaccharides, in either free or bound forms, play crucial roles in a wide range of biological processes. Increasing appreciation of their roles in cellular communication, interaction, pathogenesis, and prebiotic functions has stimulated tremendous interests in their synthesis. Pure and structurally defined oligosaccharides are essential for fundamental studies. On the other hand, for those with near term medical and nutraceutical applications, their large-scale synthesis is necessary. Unfortunately, oligosaccharides are notoriously difficult in their synthesis, and their enormous diverse structures leave a vast gap between what have been synthesized in laboratory and those present in various biological systems. While enzymes and microbes are nature’s catalysts for oligosaccharides, their effective use is not without challenges. Using examples of galactose-containing oligosaccharides, this review analyzes the pros and cons of these two forms of biocatalysts and provides an updated view on the status of biocatalysis in this important field. Over the past few years, a large number of novel galactosidases were discovered and/or engineered for improved synthesis via transglycosylation. The use of salvage pathway for regeneration of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-galactose has made the use of Leloir glycosyltransferases simpler and more efficient. The recent success of large-scale synthesis of 2′ fucosyllactose heralded the power of whole-cell biocatalysis as a scalable technology. While it still lags behind enzyme catalysis in terms of the number of oligosaccharides synthesized, an acceleration in the use of this form of biocatalyst is expected as rapid advances in synthetic biology have made the engineering of whole cell biocatalysts less arduous and less time consuming. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Springer Journals

Enzyme and microbial technology for synthesis of bioactive oligosaccharides: an update

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Biotechnology
ISSN
0175-7598
eISSN
1432-0614
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00253-018-8839-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Oligosaccharides, in either free or bound forms, play crucial roles in a wide range of biological processes. Increasing appreciation of their roles in cellular communication, interaction, pathogenesis, and prebiotic functions has stimulated tremendous interests in their synthesis. Pure and structurally defined oligosaccharides are essential for fundamental studies. On the other hand, for those with near term medical and nutraceutical applications, their large-scale synthesis is necessary. Unfortunately, oligosaccharides are notoriously difficult in their synthesis, and their enormous diverse structures leave a vast gap between what have been synthesized in laboratory and those present in various biological systems. While enzymes and microbes are nature’s catalysts for oligosaccharides, their effective use is not without challenges. Using examples of galactose-containing oligosaccharides, this review analyzes the pros and cons of these two forms of biocatalysts and provides an updated view on the status of biocatalysis in this important field. Over the past few years, a large number of novel galactosidases were discovered and/or engineered for improved synthesis via transglycosylation. The use of salvage pathway for regeneration of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-galactose has made the use of Leloir glycosyltransferases simpler and more efficient. The recent success of large-scale synthesis of 2′ fucosyllactose heralded the power of whole-cell biocatalysis as a scalable technology. While it still lags behind enzyme catalysis in terms of the number of oligosaccharides synthesized, an acceleration in the use of this form of biocatalyst is expected as rapid advances in synthetic biology have made the engineering of whole cell biocatalysts less arduous and less time consuming.

Journal

Applied Microbiology and BiotechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 23, 2018

References

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