Environmental Knowledge, Technology, and Values: Reconstructing Max Scheler’s Phenomenological Environmental Sociology

Environmental Knowledge, Technology, and Values: Reconstructing Max Scheler’s Phenomenological... In light of research showing that climate change policy opinions and perceptions of climate change are conditioned by pre-held values, Max Scheler’s axiology, conception of ethos, and sociology of knowledge are revisited. Scheler provides a critical analysis of the values surrounding modern technology’s relation to nature, especially in his assessment of the subordination of life to utility, or, the “ethos of industrialism”. The ethos of industrialism is said to influence the modern understanding of the environment as a machine to be controlled for human aims. Scheler’s phenomenological proto-environmental sociology can contribute to the environmental social sciences in three ways: (1) articulating the axiological basis of human knowledge of the environment; (2) offering new values to consider in future research on the social dimensions of human-nature relations; and (3) a framework for connecting socio-ecological analysis with evaluation, specifically for evaluating different types of technologies based on their relation to the environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Studies Springer Journals

Environmental Knowledge, Technology, and Values: Reconstructing Max Scheler’s Phenomenological Environmental Sociology

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Philosophy; Philosophy, general; Philosophy of the Social Sciences; Political Philosophy; Modern Philosophy; Sociolinguistics
ISSN
0163-8548
eISSN
1572-851X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10746-017-9439-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In light of research showing that climate change policy opinions and perceptions of climate change are conditioned by pre-held values, Max Scheler’s axiology, conception of ethos, and sociology of knowledge are revisited. Scheler provides a critical analysis of the values surrounding modern technology’s relation to nature, especially in his assessment of the subordination of life to utility, or, the “ethos of industrialism”. The ethos of industrialism is said to influence the modern understanding of the environment as a machine to be controlled for human aims. Scheler’s phenomenological proto-environmental sociology can contribute to the environmental social sciences in three ways: (1) articulating the axiological basis of human knowledge of the environment; (2) offering new values to consider in future research on the social dimensions of human-nature relations; and (3) a framework for connecting socio-ecological analysis with evaluation, specifically for evaluating different types of technologies based on their relation to the environment.

Journal

Human StudiesSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 27, 2017

References

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