ENU mutagenesis in zebrafish—from genes to complex diseases

ENU mutagenesis in zebrafish—from genes to complex diseases Mammalian Genome 11, 511–519 (2000). DOI: 10.1007/s003350010098 Incorporating Mouse Genome © Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2000 Ela W. Knapik Institute of Mammalian Genetics, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Ingolsta ¨dter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany Received: 16 December 1999 / Accepted: 16 December 1999 The Human Genome Project is in full swing, and every day we zebrafish had not yet been established, although Goff and others at know more of the sequences that define us (Burris et al. 1998). Harvard and MIT had shown that microsatellite markers were Some smaller bacterial genomes are already sequenced and so are present in the zebrafish genome (Goff et al. 1992). In 1994 the first the yeast (S. cerevisiae) and worm (C. elegans) genomes. Progress RAPD-based map for zebrafish was welcome, although it provided in sequencing technologies promises that within the next few years only a temporary solution (Postlethwait et al 1994). The 1996 we will know the entire sequence of the 3000 Mb human genome, special Zebrafish Issue of Development revealed it all, thousands and shortly afterwards the genome sequence of “the queen” of the of mutations in genes essential for early patterning and organo- genetic animal model systems, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

ENU mutagenesis in zebrafish—from genes to complex diseases

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Anatomy; Zoology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s003350010098
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mammalian Genome 11, 511–519 (2000). DOI: 10.1007/s003350010098 Incorporating Mouse Genome © Springer-Verlag New York Inc. 2000 Ela W. Knapik Institute of Mammalian Genetics, GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Ingolsta ¨dter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany Received: 16 December 1999 / Accepted: 16 December 1999 The Human Genome Project is in full swing, and every day we zebrafish had not yet been established, although Goff and others at know more of the sequences that define us (Burris et al. 1998). Harvard and MIT had shown that microsatellite markers were Some smaller bacterial genomes are already sequenced and so are present in the zebrafish genome (Goff et al. 1992). In 1994 the first the yeast (S. cerevisiae) and worm (C. elegans) genomes. Progress RAPD-based map for zebrafish was welcome, although it provided in sequencing technologies promises that within the next few years only a temporary solution (Postlethwait et al 1994). The 1996 we will know the entire sequence of the 3000 Mb human genome, special Zebrafish Issue of Development revealed it all, thousands and shortly afterwards the genome sequence of “the queen” of the of mutations in genes essential for early patterning and organo- genetic animal model systems, the

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 25, 2014

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