Entomotoxicology in burnt bodies: a case of maternal filicide-suicide by fire

Entomotoxicology in burnt bodies: a case of maternal filicide-suicide by fire One of the most common methods of maternal filicide is by fire. In this case study, a 40-year-old female and her children were found completely burned in a burnt out car. All bodies showed a degree of destruction by fire consisting to a level 3 of the Crow-Glassman Scale (CGS) and early stage of insect activity. Toxicological analyses were performed on soft tissues and body fluids still available. The results were positive for diazepam and its metabolites only for children with blood concentrations consistent with therapeutic doses of benzodiazepines. Home video surveillance cameras confirmed sedation prior to death recording the mother while administering some drops of sedative drugs in a soft drink to the children just a couple of hours before setting fire to the car. Based on autopsy findings, all victims were still alive at the time of fire. The cause of death was determined as carbon monoxide poisoning and fatal thermal injuries by fire. This case study has a special focus on the entomotoxicology and the potential role of insects in death investigations of burnt bodies, supposed to be an inadequate substratum for insect colonization. It demonstrates that in burnt bodies, arthropod colonization can be quite immediate after fire is extinguished. Toxicological analyses performed on larvae actively feeding on the children’s bodies were positive for diazepam and its metabolites in small amount compared with blood concentrations, whereas the larvae collected from the mother’s body were totally negative. These data, according to the autopsy findings and the toxicological results from the victim’s blood and tissues, supported the suspect of a non-lethal sedation prior to death, which is a common behaviour in maternal filicide. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Legal Medicine Springer Journals

Entomotoxicology in burnt bodies: a case of maternal filicide-suicide by fire

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Forensic Medicine; Medical Law; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0937-9827
eISSN
1437-1596
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00414-017-1628-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the most common methods of maternal filicide is by fire. In this case study, a 40-year-old female and her children were found completely burned in a burnt out car. All bodies showed a degree of destruction by fire consisting to a level 3 of the Crow-Glassman Scale (CGS) and early stage of insect activity. Toxicological analyses were performed on soft tissues and body fluids still available. The results were positive for diazepam and its metabolites only for children with blood concentrations consistent with therapeutic doses of benzodiazepines. Home video surveillance cameras confirmed sedation prior to death recording the mother while administering some drops of sedative drugs in a soft drink to the children just a couple of hours before setting fire to the car. Based on autopsy findings, all victims were still alive at the time of fire. The cause of death was determined as carbon monoxide poisoning and fatal thermal injuries by fire. This case study has a special focus on the entomotoxicology and the potential role of insects in death investigations of burnt bodies, supposed to be an inadequate substratum for insect colonization. It demonstrates that in burnt bodies, arthropod colonization can be quite immediate after fire is extinguished. Toxicological analyses performed on larvae actively feeding on the children’s bodies were positive for diazepam and its metabolites in small amount compared with blood concentrations, whereas the larvae collected from the mother’s body were totally negative. These data, according to the autopsy findings and the toxicological results from the victim’s blood and tissues, supported the suspect of a non-lethal sedation prior to death, which is a common behaviour in maternal filicide.

Journal

International Journal of Legal MedicineSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 9, 2017

References

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