Empirical Identification of Non-Informational Trades Using Trading Volume Data

Empirical Identification of Non-Informational Trades Using Trading Volume Data This paper empirically identifies non-informational and informational trades using stock returns and trading volume data of the U.S., Japanese, and U.K. stock markets and five individual firms. We achieve the identification by imposing a restriction from theoretical considerations. Our results show that trading volume is mainly driven by non-informational trades, while stock price movements are primarily driven by informational trades. We also find that, around the 1987 stock market crash, trading volumes due to non-informational trades increased dramatically, while the decline in stock market prices was due mainly to informational trades. Increases in volatilities both in returns and in trading volumes during and after the crash are mainly due to non-informational trades. Regarding the trading volume-serial correlation in the stock returns relationship, we find evidence that is consistent with theoretical predictions that non-informational components can account for high trading volume accompanied by a low serial correlation of stock returns. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting Springer Journals

Empirical Identification of Non-Informational Trades Using Trading Volume Data

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/empirical-identification-of-non-informational-trades-using-trading-QIiibM2MdY
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Finance; Corporate Finance; Accounting/Auditing; Econometrics; Operation Research/Decision Theory
ISSN
0924-865X
eISSN
1573-7179
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1012735529805
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper empirically identifies non-informational and informational trades using stock returns and trading volume data of the U.S., Japanese, and U.K. stock markets and five individual firms. We achieve the identification by imposing a restriction from theoretical considerations. Our results show that trading volume is mainly driven by non-informational trades, while stock price movements are primarily driven by informational trades. We also find that, around the 1987 stock market crash, trading volumes due to non-informational trades increased dramatically, while the decline in stock market prices was due mainly to informational trades. Increases in volatilities both in returns and in trading volumes during and after the crash are mainly due to non-informational trades. Regarding the trading volume-serial correlation in the stock returns relationship, we find evidence that is consistent with theoretical predictions that non-informational components can account for high trading volume accompanied by a low serial correlation of stock returns.

Journal

Review of Quantitative Finance and AccountingSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 3, 2004

References

  • Market Statistics and Technical Analysis: The Role of Volume
    Blume, L.; Easley, D.; O'Hara, M.
  • Liquidity and Market Structure
    Grossman, S. J.; Miller, M. H.
  • Time Series Implications of Aggregate Dividend Behavior
    Lee, B. S.
  • An Investigation of Transaction Data for NYSE Stocks
    Wood, R. A.; McInish, T. H.; Ord, J. K.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off