Emotional reactions to the 3D virtual body and future willingness: the effects of self-esteem and social physique anxiety

Emotional reactions to the 3D virtual body and future willingness: the effects of self-esteem and... This study examined how the participant’s self-esteem and social physique anxiety affected the emotional reactions to viewing their own virtual body and willingness to participate in the virtual experience in the future. Three-dimensional body scanning technology was used as a virtual reality tool. Ninety-three (51 males and 42 females) subjects participated in the experiment, who were 18+ years old, both genders, and had no history of musculoskeletal or mental problems. The experiment consisted of the three phases, including the pre-scanning survey, 3D body scanning, and post-scanning evaluation. The results verified causal relationships that led to certain types of emotions after viewing the 3D virtual body and the willingness to participate in a future session, within the domains of self-esteem and social physique anxiety. Specifically, self-confidence (positive dimension of self-esteem) was strongly associated with positive emotions. The “other-oriented” perspective of social physique anxiety exhibited positive correlations with negative emotions. The participants who showed positive emotions indicated a strong willingness to participate in another session of 3D body scanning in the future, but those with negative emotions also showed their positive willingness to participate in the future session. It signified that regardless of their emotional responses (positive or negative) to viewing their 3D virtual body, the participants were willing to experience their 3D virtual body in the future. The findings suggested that this virtual reality approach could be used as a potentially effective, clinical tool for patients with body image-related disorders. Study limitations and future research were also discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Virtual Reality Springer Journals

Emotional reactions to the 3D virtual body and future willingness: the effects of self-esteem and social physique anxiety

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag London
Subject
Computer Science; Computer Graphics; Computing Methodologies; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); Image Processing and Computer Vision; User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction
ISSN
1359-4338
eISSN
1434-9957
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10055-017-0314-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examined how the participant’s self-esteem and social physique anxiety affected the emotional reactions to viewing their own virtual body and willingness to participate in the virtual experience in the future. Three-dimensional body scanning technology was used as a virtual reality tool. Ninety-three (51 males and 42 females) subjects participated in the experiment, who were 18+ years old, both genders, and had no history of musculoskeletal or mental problems. The experiment consisted of the three phases, including the pre-scanning survey, 3D body scanning, and post-scanning evaluation. The results verified causal relationships that led to certain types of emotions after viewing the 3D virtual body and the willingness to participate in a future session, within the domains of self-esteem and social physique anxiety. Specifically, self-confidence (positive dimension of self-esteem) was strongly associated with positive emotions. The “other-oriented” perspective of social physique anxiety exhibited positive correlations with negative emotions. The participants who showed positive emotions indicated a strong willingness to participate in another session of 3D body scanning in the future, but those with negative emotions also showed their positive willingness to participate in the future session. It signified that regardless of their emotional responses (positive or negative) to viewing their 3D virtual body, the participants were willing to experience their 3D virtual body in the future. The findings suggested that this virtual reality approach could be used as a potentially effective, clinical tool for patients with body image-related disorders. Study limitations and future research were also discussed.

Journal

Virtual RealitySpringer Journals

Published: May 18, 2017

References

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