Emily Chamlee-Wright (2010) The cultural and political economy of recovery

Emily Chamlee-Wright (2010) The cultural and political economy of recovery Rev Austrian Econ (2011) 24:323–325 DOI 10.1007/s11138-010-0135-z Emily Chamlee-Wright (2010) The cultural and political economy of recovery New York: Routledge Joshua Thomas McCabe Published online: 23 November 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010 Hurricane Katrina was one of those events in American history which remind us that race and class are still salient issues with which we need to come to grips. In the aftermath of Katrina, a flurry of books came out purporting to deal with just such issues. While very few of them actually had anything new to say, there were a few exceptions to the rule. Emily Chamlee-Wright’s The Cultural and Political Economy of Recovery is one of those exceptions. Chamlee-Wright sets out with two goals in mind. The first is to change how economists think about the study of social phenomena. On this point, she has mixed success. The second goal is to change how policymakers and other stakeholders view success in post-disaster recovery. It is on this point that Chamlee-Wright is most successful. Chamlee-Wright seeks to radically alter the way economists study their subject. Neoclassical economics, with its emphasis on mathematical models and econometric testing, is particularly unsuited for the task at hand. The http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Review of Austrian Economics Springer Journals

Emily Chamlee-Wright (2010) The cultural and political economy of recovery

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Economics; Public Finance; Political Science; History of Economic Thought/Methodology
ISSN
0889-3047
eISSN
1573-7128
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11138-010-0135-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rev Austrian Econ (2011) 24:323–325 DOI 10.1007/s11138-010-0135-z Emily Chamlee-Wright (2010) The cultural and political economy of recovery New York: Routledge Joshua Thomas McCabe Published online: 23 November 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010 Hurricane Katrina was one of those events in American history which remind us that race and class are still salient issues with which we need to come to grips. In the aftermath of Katrina, a flurry of books came out purporting to deal with just such issues. While very few of them actually had anything new to say, there were a few exceptions to the rule. Emily Chamlee-Wright’s The Cultural and Political Economy of Recovery is one of those exceptions. Chamlee-Wright sets out with two goals in mind. The first is to change how economists think about the study of social phenomena. On this point, she has mixed success. The second goal is to change how policymakers and other stakeholders view success in post-disaster recovery. It is on this point that Chamlee-Wright is most successful. Chamlee-Wright seeks to radically alter the way economists study their subject. Neoclassical economics, with its emphasis on mathematical models and econometric testing, is particularly unsuited for the task at hand. The

Journal

The Review of Austrian EconomicsSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 23, 2010

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