Electromagnetic Monitoring of Hydraulic Fracturing: Relationship to Permeability, Seismicity, and Stress

Electromagnetic Monitoring of Hydraulic Fracturing: Relationship to Permeability, Seismicity, and... Hydraulic fracking is a geoengineering application designed to enhance subsurface permeability to maximize fluid and gas flow. Fracking is commonly used in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), tight shale gas, and coal seam gas (CSG) plays and in $$\hbox {CO}_2$$ CO 2 storage scenarios. Common monitoring methods include microseismics and mapping small earthquakes with great resolution associated with fracture opening at reservoir depth. Recently, electromagnetic (EM) methods have been employed in the field to provide an alternative way of direct detection of fluids as they are pumped in the ground. Surface magnetotelluric (MT) measurements across EGS show subtle yet detectable changes during fracking derived from time-lapse MT deployments. Changes are directional and are predominantly aligned with current stress field, dictating preferential fracture orientation, supported by microseismic monitoring of frack-related earthquakes. Modeling studies prior to the injection are crucial for survey design and feasibility of monitoring fracks. In particular, knowledge of sediment thickness plays a fundamental role in resolving subtle changes. Numerical forward modeling studies clearly favor some form of downhole measurement to enhance sensitivity; however, these have yet to be conclusively demonstrated in the field. Nevertheless, real surface-based monitoring examples do not necessarily replicate the expected magnitude of change derived from forward modeling and are larger than expected in some cases from EGS and CSG systems. It appears the injected fluid volume alone cannot account for the surface change in resistivity, but connectedness of pore space is also significantly enhanced and nonlinear. Recent numerical studies emphasize the importance of percolation threshold of the fracture network on both electrical resistivity and permeability, which may play an important role in accounting for temporal changes in surface EM measurements during hydraulic fracking. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Surveys in Geophysics Springer Journals

Electromagnetic Monitoring of Hydraulic Fracturing: Relationship to Permeability, Seismicity, and Stress

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Earth Sciences; Geophysics/Geodesy; Earth Sciences, general; Astronomy, Observations and Techniques
ISSN
0169-3298
eISSN
1573-0956
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10712-017-9426-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hydraulic fracking is a geoengineering application designed to enhance subsurface permeability to maximize fluid and gas flow. Fracking is commonly used in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), tight shale gas, and coal seam gas (CSG) plays and in $$\hbox {CO}_2$$ CO 2 storage scenarios. Common monitoring methods include microseismics and mapping small earthquakes with great resolution associated with fracture opening at reservoir depth. Recently, electromagnetic (EM) methods have been employed in the field to provide an alternative way of direct detection of fluids as they are pumped in the ground. Surface magnetotelluric (MT) measurements across EGS show subtle yet detectable changes during fracking derived from time-lapse MT deployments. Changes are directional and are predominantly aligned with current stress field, dictating preferential fracture orientation, supported by microseismic monitoring of frack-related earthquakes. Modeling studies prior to the injection are crucial for survey design and feasibility of monitoring fracks. In particular, knowledge of sediment thickness plays a fundamental role in resolving subtle changes. Numerical forward modeling studies clearly favor some form of downhole measurement to enhance sensitivity; however, these have yet to be conclusively demonstrated in the field. Nevertheless, real surface-based monitoring examples do not necessarily replicate the expected magnitude of change derived from forward modeling and are larger than expected in some cases from EGS and CSG systems. It appears the injected fluid volume alone cannot account for the surface change in resistivity, but connectedness of pore space is also significantly enhanced and nonlinear. Recent numerical studies emphasize the importance of percolation threshold of the fracture network on both electrical resistivity and permeability, which may play an important role in accounting for temporal changes in surface EM measurements during hydraulic fracking.

Journal

Surveys in GeophysicsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 30, 2017

References

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