Electrical Stimulation Increases Random Migration of Human Dermal Fibroblasts

Electrical Stimulation Increases Random Migration of Human Dermal Fibroblasts Exogenous electrical stimulation (ES) has been investigated as a therapy for chronic wounds, as the skin produces currents and electrical fields (EFs) during wound healing. ES therapies operate by applying small EFs to the skin to mimic the transepithelial potentials that occur during the granulation phase of wound healing. Here, we investigated the effect of short duration (10 min) ES on the migration of HDFs using various magnitudes of physiologically relevant EFs. We modeled cutaneous injury by culturing HDFs in custom chambers that allowed the application of ES and then performed timelapse microscopy on a standard wound model. Using MATLAB to process cell coordinate data, we determined that the cells were migrating randomly and fit mean squared displacement data to the persistent random walk equation using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. Results indicated that application of 25–100 mV/mm DC EFs to HDFs on either uncoated or FN-coated surfaces demonstrated no significant changes in viability or proliferation. Of significance is that the HDFs increased random migration behavior under some ES conditions even after 10 min, providing a mechanism to enhance wound healing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Biomedical Engineering Springer Journals

Electrical Stimulation Increases Random Migration of Human Dermal Fibroblasts

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/electrical-stimulation-increases-random-migration-of-human-dermal-54Q1UqvxmA
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Biomedical Engineering Society
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Biomedical Engineering; Biological and Medical Physics, Biophysics; Classical Mechanics; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
0090-6964
eISSN
1573-9686
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10439-017-1849-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Exogenous electrical stimulation (ES) has been investigated as a therapy for chronic wounds, as the skin produces currents and electrical fields (EFs) during wound healing. ES therapies operate by applying small EFs to the skin to mimic the transepithelial potentials that occur during the granulation phase of wound healing. Here, we investigated the effect of short duration (10 min) ES on the migration of HDFs using various magnitudes of physiologically relevant EFs. We modeled cutaneous injury by culturing HDFs in custom chambers that allowed the application of ES and then performed timelapse microscopy on a standard wound model. Using MATLAB to process cell coordinate data, we determined that the cells were migrating randomly and fit mean squared displacement data to the persistent random walk equation using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. Results indicated that application of 25–100 mV/mm DC EFs to HDFs on either uncoated or FN-coated surfaces demonstrated no significant changes in viability or proliferation. Of significance is that the HDFs increased random migration behavior under some ES conditions even after 10 min, providing a mechanism to enhance wound healing.

Journal

Annals of Biomedical EngineeringSpringer Journals

Published: May 9, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off