Effects of salinity, C/S ratio, S/N ratio on the BESI process, and treatment of nanofiltration concentrate

Effects of salinity, C/S ratio, S/N ratio on the BESI process, and treatment of nanofiltration... A laboratory-scale biodegradation and electron transfer based on the sulfur metabolism in the integrated (BESI®) process was used to treat a saline petrochemical nanofiltration concentrate (NFC). The integrated process consisted of activated sludge sulfate reduction (SR), and sulfide oxidation (SO) reactors, and a biofilm nitrification reactor. During the process, the total removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were 76.2, 83.8, and 73.1%, respectively. In the SR reactor, most of the organic degradation occurred and approximately 70% COD were removed by the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In the SO reactor, both the autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifications were observed to take place. In parallel, batch experiments were conducted to detect the effects of different C/S and S/N ratios on COD removal and denitrification efficiency. The batch experiments were also conducted to detect the effects of salinity on COD and sulfate reduction. The composition of pollutants in the wastewater was complex, and some existing organics were not degraded by the SRB. The non-SRB groups also played important roles in the reactor. Under salinity-induced stress, the metabolisms of the SRBs and non-SRB groups were both inhibited. However, 6 g/L NaCl did not have much effect on the final COD removal efficiency. In the batch experiments, the added sulfide served as the electron donor for autotrophic denitrification. The added organics provided substance for heterotrophic denitrification. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Effects of salinity, C/S ratio, S/N ratio on the BESI process, and treatment of nanofiltration concentrate

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-9585-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A laboratory-scale biodegradation and electron transfer based on the sulfur metabolism in the integrated (BESI®) process was used to treat a saline petrochemical nanofiltration concentrate (NFC). The integrated process consisted of activated sludge sulfate reduction (SR), and sulfide oxidation (SO) reactors, and a biofilm nitrification reactor. During the process, the total removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia nitrogen, and total nitrogen (TN) were 76.2, 83.8, and 73.1%, respectively. In the SR reactor, most of the organic degradation occurred and approximately 70% COD were removed by the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In the SO reactor, both the autotrophic and heterotrophic denitrifications were observed to take place. In parallel, batch experiments were conducted to detect the effects of different C/S and S/N ratios on COD removal and denitrification efficiency. The batch experiments were also conducted to detect the effects of salinity on COD and sulfate reduction. The composition of pollutants in the wastewater was complex, and some existing organics were not degraded by the SRB. The non-SRB groups also played important roles in the reactor. Under salinity-induced stress, the metabolisms of the SRBs and non-SRB groups were both inhibited. However, 6 g/L NaCl did not have much effect on the final COD removal efficiency. In the batch experiments, the added sulfide served as the electron donor for autotrophic denitrification. The added organics provided substance for heterotrophic denitrification.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 15, 2017

References

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