Effects of night-time on-call work on heart rate variability before bed and sleep quality in visiting nurses

Effects of night-time on-call work on heart rate variability before bed and sleep quality in... Purpose In Japan, many visiting nurses work carrying cell phones to respond to calls from users even at night (on-call work). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether on-call work affected heart rate variability (HRV) before bed and decreased sleep quality in visiting nurses even if their sleep was not interrupted due to actual calls. Methods Thirty-one visiting nurses (mean age, 49.8 years; standard deviation, 6.3 years) were asked to record their 2.5-min resting HRV before bed, and to undergo one-channel sleep electroencephalography (EEG) and subjective sleep evaluations upon waking (Oguri, Shirakawa, and Azumi Sleep Inventory) at home for 4–5 consecutive days, including both on-call and non-on-call days. Paired data sets of outcome measures, including HRV parameters, sleep macrostructure variables, and subjective sleep quality scores between on-call and non-on-call days were compared; the most recent measurements for each category were used for each subject. Results There were no differences in HRV measures and objective sleep EEG variables. A significant increase in “sleepi- ness on rising” and a decrease in “feeling refreshed” were observed on on-call days (P = 0.019 and 0.021, respectively), and younger subjects (≤ 51 years old) demonstrated a significant reduction in “sleepiness on rising” (significant interaction http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health Springer Journals

Effects of night-time on-call work on heart rate variability before bed and sleep quality in visiting nurses

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Environment; Environmental Health; Rehabilitation; Occupational Medicine/Industrial Medicine
ISSN
0340-0131
eISSN
1432-1246
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00420-018-1317-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose In Japan, many visiting nurses work carrying cell phones to respond to calls from users even at night (on-call work). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether on-call work affected heart rate variability (HRV) before bed and decreased sleep quality in visiting nurses even if their sleep was not interrupted due to actual calls. Methods Thirty-one visiting nurses (mean age, 49.8 years; standard deviation, 6.3 years) were asked to record their 2.5-min resting HRV before bed, and to undergo one-channel sleep electroencephalography (EEG) and subjective sleep evaluations upon waking (Oguri, Shirakawa, and Azumi Sleep Inventory) at home for 4–5 consecutive days, including both on-call and non-on-call days. Paired data sets of outcome measures, including HRV parameters, sleep macrostructure variables, and subjective sleep quality scores between on-call and non-on-call days were compared; the most recent measurements for each category were used for each subject. Results There were no differences in HRV measures and objective sleep EEG variables. A significant increase in “sleepi- ness on rising” and a decrease in “feeling refreshed” were observed on on-call days (P = 0.019 and 0.021, respectively), and younger subjects (≤ 51 years old) demonstrated a significant reduction in “sleepiness on rising” (significant interaction

Journal

International Archives of Occupational and Environmental HealthSpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2018

References

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