Effects of mutation of Asn694 in Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase on hydrolysis and transglucosylation

Effects of mutation of Asn694 in Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase on hydrolysis and... Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase (ANG), a member of glycoside hydrolase family 31, catalyzes hydrolysis of α-glucosidic linkages at the non-reducing end. In the presence of high concentrations of maltose, the enzyme also catalyzes the formation of α-(1→6)-glucosyl products by transglucosylation and it is used for production of the industrially useful panose and isomaltooligosaccharides. The initial transglucosylation by wild-type ANG in the presence of 100 mM maltose [Glc(α1–4)Glc] yields both α-(1→6)- and α-(1→4)-glucosidic linkages, the latter constituting ~25% of the total transfer reaction product. The maltotriose [Glc(α1–4)Glc(α1–4)Glc], α-(1→4)-glucosyl product disappears quickly, whereas the α-(1→6)-glucosyl products panose [Glc(α1–6)Glc(α1–4)Glc], isomaltose [Glc(α1–6)Glc], and isomaltotriose [Glc(α1–6)Glc(α1–6)Glc] accumulate. To modify the transglucosylation properties of ANG, residue Asn694, which was predicted to be involved in formation of the plus subsites of ANG, was replaced with Ala, Leu, Phe, and Trp. Except for N694A, the mutations enhanced the initial velocity of the α-(1→4)-transfer reaction to produce maltotriose, which was then degraded at a rate similar to that by wild-type ANG. With increasing reaction time, N694F and N694W mutations led to the accumulation of larger amounts of isomaltose and isomaltotriose than achieved with the wild-type enzyme. In the final stage of the reaction, the major product was panose (N694A and N694L) or isomaltose (N694F and N694W). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Springer Journals

Effects of mutation of Asn694 in Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase on hydrolysis and transglucosylation

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Biotechnology
ISSN
0175-7598
eISSN
1432-0614
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00253-017-8402-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aspergillus niger α-glucosidase (ANG), a member of glycoside hydrolase family 31, catalyzes hydrolysis of α-glucosidic linkages at the non-reducing end. In the presence of high concentrations of maltose, the enzyme also catalyzes the formation of α-(1→6)-glucosyl products by transglucosylation and it is used for production of the industrially useful panose and isomaltooligosaccharides. The initial transglucosylation by wild-type ANG in the presence of 100 mM maltose [Glc(α1–4)Glc] yields both α-(1→6)- and α-(1→4)-glucosidic linkages, the latter constituting ~25% of the total transfer reaction product. The maltotriose [Glc(α1–4)Glc(α1–4)Glc], α-(1→4)-glucosyl product disappears quickly, whereas the α-(1→6)-glucosyl products panose [Glc(α1–6)Glc(α1–4)Glc], isomaltose [Glc(α1–6)Glc], and isomaltotriose [Glc(α1–6)Glc(α1–6)Glc] accumulate. To modify the transglucosylation properties of ANG, residue Asn694, which was predicted to be involved in formation of the plus subsites of ANG, was replaced with Ala, Leu, Phe, and Trp. Except for N694A, the mutations enhanced the initial velocity of the α-(1→4)-transfer reaction to produce maltotriose, which was then degraded at a rate similar to that by wild-type ANG. With increasing reaction time, N694F and N694W mutations led to the accumulation of larger amounts of isomaltose and isomaltotriose than achieved with the wild-type enzyme. In the final stage of the reaction, the major product was panose (N694A and N694L) or isomaltose (N694F and N694W).

Journal

Applied Microbiology and BiotechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 7, 2017

References

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